Fueling High PricesOn the day President Obama took office in January of 2009, regular unleaded gasoline was selling nationally at an average price of $1.83 per gallon. The national average price has recently been as high as $3.98 per gallon, according to the American Automobile Association’s Daily Fuel Gauge Report. (The highest recorded average price was set on July 17, 2008, when it hit $4.11 per gallon.) That is not good news for President Obama.

The city of Prichard, Alabama, is the best proof that more states need Governors such as New Jersey’s Chris Christie, who is willing to take on a pension crisis. For years, Prichard was warned that if no changes were made to its pension fund, the money would be gone by 2009. The warnings went unheeded, and now the pension funds have disappeared.

When the monies dried up, Prichard stopped sending pension checks to its 150 retired workers — a violation of state law. Meanwhile, those who once collectedj pension checks found themselves struggling financially.

General Motors and Chrysler, so the story goes, have repaid the dollars the federal government loaned them to keep them from going belly up. Therefore, it is said, every American should ignore the nagging constitutional and ethical questions and applaud the government’s efforts to turn these companies around. After all, what is more important: some yellowed piece of parchment or, as President Barack Obama put it, “millions of jobs [that] wouldn’t have been around anymore” if Uncle Sam hadn’t stepped in?

President Barack Obama has lately been touting the government’s takeover of two of the Big Three automakers as an unqualified success. This is not surprising considering the large hand he had in it; nor is it surprising that his statements on the subject have been less than forthright.

moneyEconomists Richard M. Ebeling and Matthew J. Slaughter testified before the House Monetary Policy Subcommittee May 11 and agreed that spending must be cut to avert a financial catastrophe, but disagreed about the risks of failing to raise the national debt limit.

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