jobsAccording to the White House on October 30, the $787-billion stimulus plan has created or saved about one million jobs, but that number is conveniently unverifiable. There is simply no way to know with certainty how many workers would have lost their jobs without the stimulus. And of course, the admininstration-supplied estimate does not even take into account how many jobs may have been lost because of the stimulus program, ignoring the fact that the "stimulus" money that was used to create jobs in certain government-favored sectors of the economy had to be siphoned out of the economy as a whole, destroying jobs elsewhere.

The U.S. economy grew at a better-than-expected 3.5 percent annualized rate in the third quarter, according to an “advance estimate” released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) October 29.

cover story dollarIt began as a series of explosive claims in a British newspaper on Tuesday, October 6, and quickly turned into an all-out rout of the already beleaguered U.S. dollar on international markets.

Wall StreetLess than a week after Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke urged Congress to act with dispatch to pass new legislation giving the Fed and the Federal Government more surveillance powers and control over the financial sector, the Obama administration has unveiled a bill that, if passed, would put most of Bernanke’s proposals into effect.

AIG flagA year after the onset of the greatest financial crisis since the Great Depression, details continue to emerge of the sordid secret deals cut by the Federal Reserve in bailing out certain financial giants. The very latest, courtesy of Bloomberg News, alleges that the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, under the leadership of Timothy Geithner (now U.S. Treasury Secretary), engineered a sweetheart deal to pay off holders of AIG debt at par, rather than the 40 cents on the dollar that AIG negotiators had been pushing for.