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creditNext up for ailing mega-banks: a credit card meltdown. No surprise here, really; Americans have overused credit cards for years, trusting always in unending economic expansion and plentiful employment to guarantee their ability to service consumer debt.

medicareSocial Security and Medicare, Big Government’s two most cherished social-welfare programs, are running out of money far faster than expected, thanks to the persistent economic downturn. Medicare, which is already running a deficit, will run out of money by 2017, while Social Security will be broke 20 years after that, according to new estimates from the Obama Administration.

OperationPresident Barack Obama, speaking from the White House's State Dining Room on May 11, hailed the healthcare industry's promise to cut $2 trillion in costs over 10 years as "a watershed event." The president hosted a meeting attended by health insurance, medical device, pharmaceutical, and hospital CEOs, three physicians (all officers of the American Medical Association), representatives of the Service Employees International Union, and administration officials.

piggy bankIt’s official: this year’s budget deficit will be one for the record books. The latest figures released by the Obama Administration contemplate a $1.8 trillion deficit for fiscal 2009 as the United States economy continues to significantly underperform relative to earlier forecasts. This year’s record-setting deficit is now reckoned to be four times last year’s — the previous record-setter. Next year, the deficit is expected to decline but still to exceed $1.3 trillion — and that’s only if everything goes according to plan.

UnemploymentYou know the economy is in the tank when officials hail the loss of 539,000 non-farm jobs in the U.S. economy during the month of April as good news. President Barack Obama termed the latest unemployment figures "somewhat encouraging," despite the fact that unemployment rose from 8.5 to 8.9 percent nationally. Obama was somewhat encouraged in part because most economists had expected April job losses to be higher than 600,000, as had happened in each of the first three months of 2009.

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