Economy

Obama gesturing while speakingITEM: An editorial entitled "The Federal Reserve acts boldly to ease credit conditions" in the Seattle Times for March 20 commented: "The Federal Reserve decision to pump another trillion dollars [more precisely: $1.15 trillion] into the economy still has the capacity to raise eyebrows."

Hummers for sale at a GM car lotThere's something fundamentally wrong with the world when a country known for being the very embodiment of Old World socialism — Sweden — serves up an object lesson in capitalism to the United States. Amid all the global furor surrounding government bailouts, rescue packages for corporations deemed "too large to fail," and scandalous executive bonuses shelled out with taxpayer dollars, tiny Sweden has been quietly doing the right thing where its own pivotal domestic automaker, Saab, is concerned.

Obama moneyPresident Barack Obama’s statement last Friday that we’re “starting to see ... glimmers of hope across the economy” has gotten quite a bit of publicity. What has gotten less coverage is the president’s rationale for being so optimistic in the face of bad economic news such as the unemployment rate, which rose to 8.5 percent last month, the highest unemployment rate in over a quarter of a century. (This figure does not take into account long-term unemployed who have given up looking for jobs.)

Piggy bankAfter a record $192.3 billion federal budget deficit for March, the U.S. Treasury Department reported a $956.8 billion federal deficit for the first half of fiscal 2009 — already nearly $1 trillion. As the Treasury published the news of the deficit, President Obama told the press on April 10, “What we’re starting to see is glimmers of hope across the economy.”

Image of $100 billsIt's official: the Obama administration intends to nationalize the entire financial sector. If there were any lingering doubts as to the intentions of President Barack Obama and Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, they were dispelled by an announcement on March 26 detailing the Treasury Department's new "framework for regulatory reform."

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