Friday's jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics buttressed the position of many who have seen a widening disparity between Wall Street's enthusiasm and Main Street's gloom over the health of the economy.

The battle between a stock market that moves inexorably higher and an economy that continues to languish will be won when reality is recognized: The economy is getting weaker and consequently stocks are overpriced.

After looting some 30 percent of selected bank account holders’ deposits in Cyprus on behalf of the so-called “Troika”— the European Union (EU), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and the European Central Bank (ECB) — eurozone boss Jeroen Dijsselbloem told reporters this week that taking money from savers in other crisis-hit nations to prop up banks could become the norm. Across Europe, analysts, experts, economists, markets, and especially savers recoiled in horror, prompting the increasingly discredited Dutch Finance Minister to backtrack slightly. In Cyprus, meanwhile, anger is boiling over as authorities prepare to impose capital controls in an effort to avoid a full-blown bank run. 

 

 

 

Boasting the laudable goal of eliminating property taxes throughout the State of Texas, a recently filed Value-Added-Tax (VAT) bill — House Bill 3472 — would replace not only property taxes, but also business franchise taxes, a limited statewide sales tax, and various other local sales taxes with a VAT. Texans have never experienced the economically depressing effects of a VAT, but once they realize what those effects would be, they will oppose any VAT in order to preserve their state’s prosperity.

 

Concerned about the out-of-control Federal Reserve System and the increasingly unstable fiat dollar managed by the privately owned central bank, lawmakers in Arizona are following in Utah’s footsteps to come up with a potential alternative that protects citizens. Legislation to treat gold and silver as legal tender already sailed through the state Senate in late February, and last week, the Arizona House Financial Institutions Committee voted 4 to 2 to advance the bill as well. Activists are now working hard to keep it moving along.

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