A closer look behind the Conference Board's rosy consumer confidence survey released on Monday reveals an economy, at the individual and family level, that hardly merits such optimism.

The Rockefeller Foundation, mega-banks, and even taxpayers via the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) have provided millions of dollars toward pushing a new type of “socially responsible” corporate structure known as the “benefit corporation.” More than 15 states have already signed on. Critics, however, say the scheme will further undermine what remains of the market system while promoting deeply controversial United Nations Agenda 21-linked notions of “sustainable development.”

Stock and commodities markets went into a two-day slide after Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke hinted that the United States would end so-called “quantitative easing” sometime during 2014. 

 

Detroit's Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr gave just two options to those creditors gathered in downtown Detroit on Friday: Go along with my proposal now, and you'll get the best deal you can. Don't, and you'll get less, it'll cost more, and it will take longer.

 

Central banking and Keynesian ideology make a toxic brew, the consequences of which are beginning to show up around the world.