Amid an ongoing debate over raising the debt ceiling and Congress’ seeming inability to rein in wild deficit spending, some proponents of even bigger government proposed the minting of a $1-trillion platinum coin to get around stubborn lawmakers seeking budget cuts. Seriously. Originally, the Obama administration refused to rule it out when asked by reporters, leaving analysts to speculate about whether or not they would really do it.

Then, suddenly, the privately owned Federal Reserve put its foot down and killed the scheme. In a joint statement issued with the U.S. Treasury, the central banking cartel, which holds a virtual monopoly on currency production, said no way. The Fed would not accept such a coin even if the federal government were to mint it. While never mentioned in the mainstream media, the implications of the whole episode are enormous. 

Two years ago Steve Forbes, two-time candidate for nomination for president by the Republican Party and editor of Forbes magazine, predicted “a return to the gold standard by the United States within five years … [because it would] help the nation solve a variety of economic, fiscal and monetary ills.” It’s now two years into his prediction and articles explaining how such a return would work, and why, are beginning to appear in the media.

 

The passing of scholar James Buchanan stills the voice of one who understood the fact that men, without Constitutional constraints, will vote themselves unlimited largess from the public treasury due to their own self interest. 

Now that President Obama and most of his key congressional allies are safely re-elected and the so-called “fiscal cliff” negotiated, the full consequences of the most recent elections are coming into view. Despite repeated assurances he would not raise taxes on any but the wealthiest Americans, the president (with the grudging support of many congressional Republicans), has — before even being sworn into his second term in office — enacted massive tax hikes that will affect almost every working American.

The decision to stop printing Newsweek magazine after Monday, December 31, reflects a change not only in how its subscribers access the news but a change in what they wanted to read when they got it.

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