Now that the Chevy Volt, General Motors’ electric car, is about to arrive in selected dealers’ showrooms around the country, it has been getting a lot of press. Some are puff pieces, one of which appeared in USA Today, while others are much more critical.

Back in June, Republican Senate candidates Sharron Angle of Nevada and Rand Paul of Kentucky endured criticism from the mainstream media for their comments suggesting that government-run unemployment insurance was, perhaps, not the greatest idea in the world.

October 15, US Airways asked one of its passengers flying from West Palm Beach to Kansas City to exit the airplane. Johnnie Tuitel, 47, a motivational speaker with cerebral palsy, was told that he was “too disabled to fly."

The United States would never, ever consider devaluing the dollar for export advantage, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner assured an audience of Silicon Valley business leaders in Palo Alto on October 18. “It is very important for people to understand that the United States of America and no country around the world can devalue its way to prosperity, to (be) competitive,” Geithner said. “It is not a viable, feasible strategy and we will not engage in it.” Geithner’s words appeared timed to allay concerns about the U.S. dollar before this weekend’s G-20 meeting in South Korea.

Let us be blunt: The mortgage foreclosure crisis, which first burst into full public view with Bank of America’s suspension of all foreclosures only a few days ago, has the potential to completely destroy the American real estate sector in an epic legal and economic meltdown that would make the crisis of 2007-2008 look like the proverbial Chinese tea party.