It’s official: the U.S. taxpayer is now on the hook for $2.33 billion in TARP funds given to CIT Group back in December of 2008.

When he appeared on ABC News's This Week on February 7, U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner was quizzed about the risk of the United States losing its triple-A credit rating, the chances that foreign investors might start shunning US debt, and whether the economy would suffer a double dip recession.  

Sam Dillon of the New York Times reports that the depletion of federal stimulus money will result in schools approaching "a funding cliff." Dillon claims that the federal stimulus has managed to stave off drastic cuts at public schools in most parts of the nation thus far, but that the period of sustenance will soon end.

January’s unemployment numbers were released late last week. According to the official report, unemployment fell from 10.0 to 9.7 percent last month. Employment fell in such areas as construction and transportation, while we saw the now-familiar gains in such areas as services and retail.

Claims that cabals of “banksters” control much of the world’s economy from behind closed doors have, for years now, been mainstays of those usually dismissed as “conspiracy theorists.” But since Fall 2008, which saw billions funneled into banking and other institutions deemed “too big to fail,” and since hundreds of billions remain unaccounted for; and especially since the Federal Reserve has successfully resisted efforts to make its activities more transparent — especially its dealings with foreign banks — such claims have gained both visibility and at least some credibility.