Name: T. Gorton


Senate: Washington, Republican


Cumulative Freedom Index Score: 70%


Status: Former Member of the Senate

Score Breakdown:
70% (106th Congress: 1999-2000)

Key Votes:





*** Prior to 2008, "The Freedom Index" was known as the "The Conservative Index." ***





On Passage of the Bill H.R. 4444: To authorize extension of nondiscriminatory treatment (normal trade relations treatment) to the People's Republic of China, and to establish a framework for relations between the United States and the People's Republic of China.
Vote Date: September 19, 2000Vote: AYEBad Vote.
China PNTR. This bill, H.R. 4444, would grant Communist China Permanent Normal Trade Relations (PNTR), and thereby abolish the annual review process of Chinese NTR. It would also pave the way for Chinese entry into the World Trade Organization. The bill would all but guarantee that the tyrannical Chinese government will continue to receive billions of dollars in U.S. taxpayer-subsidized trade annually through export subsidy programs such as the Export-Import Bank and multilateral organs such as the Asian Development Bank and the World Bank. Although many of those promoting PNTR for China have claimed to be doing so on the basis of "free trade," just five days earlier the Senate had voted down -- by voice vote -- an amendment by Senator Ernest Hollings (D-SC) that would have allowed PNTR but abolished U.S. export subsidies to China.

The Senate passed H.R. 4444 on September 19, 2000 by a vote of 83-15 (Roll Call 251). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 4125 to H.R. 4444: To require the President certify to Congress that the People's Republic of China has taken certain actions with respect to ensuring human rights protection.
Vote Date: September 12, 2000Vote: NAYBad Vote.
Helms Amendment to China Trade. Senator Jesse Helms (R-NC) explained that his amendment "directs the President to certify that China has met a series of human rights conditions prior to granting PNTR to Communist China." The Helms amendment would prohibit the granting of "free trade" privileges to China under Permanent Normal Trade Relations (PNTR) until China has abolished the Laogai prison-labor system and released all religious prisoners and labor leaders. In essence, the Helms amendment affirms the self-evident truth that free trade with slaves is a contradiction, and that only when China is at least partly free should trade relations be normal.

The Senate rejected the Helms amendment to H.R. 4444 on September 12, 2000 by a vote of 32-63 (Roll Call 239). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Conference Report H.R. 4810: A bill to provide for reconciliation pursuant to section 103(a)(1) of the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2001.
Vote Date: July 21, 2000Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Marriage Penalty Repeal Conference Report. This measure would phase out over five years the marriage penalty in the income tax code. The marriage penalty taxes dual-income married families at a higher rate than couples who live together but are not married. Representative Jerry Weller (R-IL) explained that this vote was about "a very basic, fundamental question," namely: "Is it right that 25 million married working couples, 50 million taxpayers, pay on average $1,400 more in higher taxes just because they are married?"

The Senate adopted the conference re-port on H.R. 4810 on July 21, 2000 by a vote of 60-34 (Roll Call 226). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 3917 to H.R. 4461 (Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000): To prohibit the use of appropriated funds for the sugar program.
Vote Date: July 20, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Abolish Sugar Subsidy. Senator John McCain (R-AZ) offered this amendment to ban funds from being used for the federal sugar subsidy program, which is largely a corporate welfare program for a few huge sugar plantation owners. "I do not quite understand how my free-enterprise, free-market, less-government-intervention, less-government-regulation colleagues will come here to the floor and argue that somehow this program is good for American citizens. It is not," McCain argued. "Clearly, the facts state that it is a subsidy paid to a privileged few and it costs American taxpayers and American families a great deal of additional money."

The Senate tabled (killed) the McCain amendment on July 20, 2000 by a vote of 65-32 (Roll Call 219). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 4461: A bill making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration and Related Agencies programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: July 20, 2000Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Fiscal 2001 Agriculture Appropriations. This massive $77.4 billion appropriations bill would fund federal agricultural subsidy programs -- as well as the federal Food Stamp program, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and several other programs -- throughout fiscal 2001. Although this bill represents about an 8 percent cut from fiscal 2000, none of the programs funded by this bill are authorized by the U.S. Constitution.

The Senate passed H.R. 4461 on July 20, 2000 by a vote of 79-13 (Roll Call 225). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3884 to H.R. 4578 (Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001): To defend the Constitutional system of checks and balances between the Legislative and Executive branches.
Vote Date: July 18, 2000Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Ban New National Monuments. Introduced by Senator Don Nickles (R-OK), this amendment is similar to that described in House bill (below), except that it is not retroactive to 1999.

[ Ban New National Monuments. This amendment by Representative James Hansen (R-UT) would ban the use of funds for the implementation of "National Monuments" designated by the president since 1999. President Clinton has used a loophole in the 1906 Antiquities Act to lock up millions of acres of land from human usage. Representative Don Young (R-AK) explained that "this President is using this act ... to designate and to dictate the use of lands. Under the Constitution, it says only the Congress shall have that responsibility.... I swore to uphold the Constitution of the United States of America. Yet, we sit in this body and allow this act to be misused by this administration and say, oh, it is to protect those lands.... This is against the Constitution. He is not protecting what should be protected. He, in fact, is running this as a fiefdom and a kingdom." ]

The Senate rejected the Nickles amendment to H.R. 4578 on July 18, 2000 by a vote of 49-50 (Roll Call 208). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 4810: A bill to provide for reconciliation pursuant to section 103(a)(1) of the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2001.
Vote Date: July 18, 2000Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Marriage Penalty Repeal. This measure would phase out over five years the marriage penalty in the income tax code. The marriage penalty taxes dual-income married families at a higher rate than couples who live together but are not married. Representative Jerry Weller (R-IL) explained that this vote was about "a very basic, fundamental question," namely: "Is it right that 25 million married working couples, 50 million taxpayers, pay on average $1,400 more in higher taxes just because they are married?"

The Senate passed H.R. 4810 on July 18, 2000 by a vote of 61-38 (Roll Call 215). We have assigned pluses to the yeas. Because this version of the bill had to be reconciled with that of the House, the Senate had another opportunity to vote on this important issue.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 8: A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to phaseout the estate and gift taxes over a 10-year period.
Vote Date: July 14, 2000Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Estate Tax Repeal. The "Death Tax Elimination Act" would phase out over 10 years the Marxist inheritance tax that is decimating family farms across the United States. While the federal inheritance tax does not go as far as the third plank in Marx's Communist Manifesto, which called for "abolition of all rights of inheritance," it does tax up to 60 percent of the value of inheritances.

The Senate passed H.R. 8 on July 14, 2000 by a vote of 59-39 (Roll Call 197). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3836 to H.R. 8 (A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to phaseout the estate and gift taxes over a 10-year period.Death Tax Elimination Act): To repeal the increase in tax on Social Security benefits.
Vote Date: July 13, 2000Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Social Security Earnings Tax Hike Repeal. This amendment by Senator Rod Grams (R-MN) is identical to the bill described in House bill H.R. 4865.

[ House Bill: Social Security Earnings Tax Hike Repeal. This bill, H.R. 4865, would repeal the 1993 Clinton-Gore tax increase on Social Security benefits. Under the provisions of the 1993 law, seniors still in the work force making more than $34,000 per year had income taxes assessed against 85 percent of their Social Security checks, up from 50 percent in years prior. This bill would bring the proportion of benefits taxed back down to 50 percent. ]


The Senate adopted the Grams amendment to H.R. 8 on July 13, 2000 by a vote of 58-41 (Roll Call 188). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 3697 to H.R. 4577 (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2001): To prohibit the expenditure of certain appropriated funds for the distribution or provision of, or the provision of a prescription for, postcoital emergency contraception.
Vote Date: June 30, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Federal Funds for Distributing "Morning-After" Pill on School Grounds. Senator Jesse Helms (R-NC) offered this amendment to ban the use of federal funds in the fiscal 2001 Labor/HHS/Education appropriations bill from being used to distribute the "morning-after" pill on school grounds to minors.

An attempt to table (kill) the Helms amendment to H.R. 4577 was defeated on June 30, 2000 by a vote of 41-54 (Roll Call 169). We have assigned pluses to the nays. The tabling motion having failed, the Helms amendment was then adopted by voice vote.



On the Motion (Motion To Waive CBA Harkin Amdt. No. 3699): To fully fund the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
Vote Date: June 30, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
$8.4 Billion in New Education Spending. Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) offered this amendment to increase spending on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) from the $7.4 billion in the pending bill ($6.0 billion in fiscal 2000) to $15.8 billion. More than doubling the cost of this huge program prompted even big spenders like Senator Arlen Specter (R-PA) to remark that "I want to see a lot more funding in a lot more places,... but this is just over the top."

The Senate rejected a motion to waive the Budget Act on the Harkin amendment to H.R 4577 on June 30, 2000 by a vote of 40-55 (Roll Call 170). Failing to receive the three-fifths vote needed to waive the Budget Act, the Harkin amendment died. We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 4577: A bill making appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: June 30, 2000Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Welfare State Mother Lode. This legislation is similar to that described in House bill (below), except that at $354.6 billion it is several billion dollars more expensive than the House version.

[ Welfare State Mother Lode. This U colossal $351.8 billion fiscal 2001 Labor/HHS/Education appropriations bill represents a spending increase of more than seven percent over fiscal 2000. Representative David Obey (D-WI) crowed that Republicans and Democrats were in a bidding war for welfare state spending: "This is ironic given the fact that all day long we were told by the majority that we could not get a vote on the amendments that we were offering on our side of the aisle because they exceeded the numbers in the budget resolution?" ]

The Senate passed H.R. 4577 on June 30, 2000 by a vote of 52-43 (Roll Call 171). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3693 to H.R. 4577 (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2001): To require a Federal floor with respect to protections for individuals enrolled in health plans.
Vote Date: June 29, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Total Federal Control Over Health Insurance Industry. Senator Byron Dorgan (D-ND) introduced this amendment to mandate that all state and private health insurance plans cover operations and procedures dictated by the federal government. The amendment would dictate to states what benefits they ought to pay their employees by decreeing "a floor of federal protection that is applicable to all individuals enrolled in private health plans or private health insurance coverage, including individuals enrolled in health insurance coverage purchased in the individual market; and ... individuals enrolled in health plans offered to State and local government employees." Senator Don Nickles (R-OK) summarized the amendment this way: "We want the Federal Government to set standards, and, oh, States, you have to meet these standards. If not, the Federal Government is going to take over."

The Senate rejected the Dorgan amendment to H.R. 4577 on June 29, 2000 by a vote of 47-51 (Roll Call 167). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion To Waive CBA RE: Dodd Amdt. No.3672): To provide $1,000,000,000 for 21st Century Community Learning Centers.
Vote Date: June 28, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
$400 Million More for 21st Century Community Learning Centers. Senator Christopher Dodd (D-CT) offered this amendment to increase to $1 billion the fiscal 2001 appropriation for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers federal after-school program. The bill already contained an appropriation of $600 million, which was itself an increase from $453 million in fiscal 2000.

The Senate rejected a motion to waive the Budget Act on the Dodd amendment to H.R. 4577 on June 28, 2000 by a vote of 48-51 (Roll Call 154). Having failed to get the three-fifths vote needed to waive the Budget Act, the point of order against the Dodd amendment was upheld and the amendment fell. We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion To Waive CBA Wellstone Amdt. No. 3631): To increase funding for part A of title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.
Vote Date: June 27, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Increased Education Spending. "This amendment just simply says," according to author Senator Paul Wellstone (D-MN), that "we should go from $8.36 billion to $10 billion -- a slight increase." Only a profligate socialist who is generous with someone else's money -- in this case, money owned by U.S. taxpayers -- could term a $1.64 billion increase "slight." The pending fiscal 2001 appropriation of $8.36 billion for Title I education spending already represented a five percent increase over fiscal 2000.

The Senate rejected a motion to waive the Budget Act on the Wellstone amendment to H.R. 4577 on June 27, 2000 by a vote of 47-52 (Roll Call 146). Having failed to get the three-fifths vote needed to waive the Budget Act, the point of order against the Wellstone amendment was upheld and the amendment fell. We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3593 to H.R. 4577 (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2001): To limit the use of funds for standards relating to ergonomic protection.
Vote Date: June 22, 2000Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Federal Regulations on Ergonomics. This amendment would prohibit OSHA from using any funds in the underlying bill to promulgate, issue, administer, implement, or enforce ergonomic standards.

The Senate adopted this amendment to H.R. 4577 on June 22, 2000 by a vote of 57-41 (Roll Call 143). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3598 to H.R. 4577 (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2001): To amend title XVIII of the Social Security Act to provide coverage of outpatient prescription drugs under the medicare program.
Vote Date: June 22, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Create Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit. Senator Chuck Robb (D-VA) introduced this amendment to require the federal government to provide "a universal, comprehensive, dependable prescription drug benefit for Medicare beneficiaries." This wealth-draining welfare benefit would cost an estimated $75 billion over the first five years alone.

The Senate rejected the Robb amendment to H.R. 4577 on June 22, 2000 by a vote of 44-53 (Roll Call 144). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3517 to S. 2522 (Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2001): To reduce the amount of funds made available for South American and Caribbean counternarcotics activities, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: June 21, 2000Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Cut Anti-Drug Foreign Aid Increase by $734 Million. Senator Slade Gorton (R-WA) introduced this amendment to cut the anti-drug foreign foreign aid allotment for South and Central America from $934 million down to $200 million. Although Gorton's amendment represents a sizable cut in the amount budgeted for the program in the fiscal 2001 foreign aid appropriations bill, the remaining $200 million is still quadruple the $50 million appropriated during fiscal 2000.

The Senate rejected the Gorton amendment to S. 2522 on June 21, 2000 by a vote of 19-79 (Roll Call 139). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 3252 to S. 2549 (National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001): To repeal the restriction on the use of Department of Defense facilities for privately funded abortions.
Vote Date: June 20, 2000Vote: NAYBad Vote.
Tax Subsidized Abortions on Military Bases. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) offered this amendment to lift the ban on abortions at military base hospitals abroad, if military personnel pay the cost of the operation themselves. Senator Mike Enzi (R-WY) explained that despite the requirement that military personnel would be required to pay the cost of the operation, the Murray amendment "would essentially require tax funds to be used to aid in elective abortions. Military hospitals and medical clinics are built with American tax dollars. Military physicians, nurses, and other support personnel are paid by federal tax dollars.... Even if the abortion procedure itself was not directly paid for by federal funds, federal tax dollars would have to be used to train military physicians to perform abortions."

The Senate tabled (killed) the Murray amendment to S. 2549 on June 20, 2000 by a vote of 50-49 (Roll Call 134). We have assigned pluses to those who voted yea to table the amendment.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3473 to S. 2549 (National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001): To enhance Federal enforcement of hate crimes and for other purposes.
Vote Date: June 20, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Federalizing "Hate Crimes" Related to Gender and "Sexual Orientation." Senator Ted Kennedy (D-MA) offered this amendment to add "gender," "sexual orientation" and "disability" to the list of federally designated victim groups protected under "Hate Crimes" law, thereby dramatically expanding federal jurisdiction. Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) explained that the Kennedy amendment "would make a federal case out of every single hate-motivated crime that occurs in this country -- including all rapes and sexual assaults, which currently are prosecuted under State law."

The Senate adopted the Kennedy amendment to S. 2549 on June 20, 2000 by a vote of 57-42 (Roll Call 136). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3184 to S.Amdt. 3183 to S. 2549 (National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001): To provide for correction of scope of waiver authority for limitation on retirement or dismantlement of strategic nuclear delivery systems and authority to waive limitation.
Vote Date: June 7, 2000Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Presidential Nuclear Disarmament Waiver. This amendment offered by Senator John Warner (R-VA) would replace language in an amendment by Senator Bob Kerrey (D-NE) to the 2001 Defense authorization bill. Kerrey's amendment would have given the president the power to unilaterally reduce nuclear arms without the approval of Congress. Currently the president must get congressional approval to do so. Warner's amendment would give the president the ability to waive the limitation only after the Department of Defense did a nuclear overview study to be completed by December 2001. Although congressional approval should not be circumvented under any circumstances, this late date means that President Clinton would be unable to reduce the number of nuclear weapons on his own, restricting him in his negotiations of an arms deal with Russia.

The Warner amendment to S. 2549 passed the Senate on June 7, 2000 by a vote of 51-47 (Roll Call 119). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Conference Report H.R. 2559: A bill to amend the Federal Crop Insurance Act to strengthen the safety net for agricultural producers by providing greater access to more affordable risk management tools and improved protection from production and income loss, to improve the efficiency and integrity of the Federal crop insurance program, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: May 25, 2000Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Farm Subsidies. This vote was to adopt the final version (conference report) of the bill that would provide $8.2 billion over the next five years for increased crop insurance subsidies. Currently, the federal government pays 13 to 57 percent of crop insurance premiums, but this bill would increase that portion to a range of 38 to 67 percent of the premiums. The aim of the increase is to curtail large emergency payments. This bill also would provide for $7.1 billion in economic assistance to farmers affected by low prices. All of this aid is especially irksome since the 1996 "Freedom to Farm" law passed by Congress was supposed to wean farmers off of harmful government subsidies.

The conference report on the farm subsidies bill, H.R. 2559, passed the Senate on May 25, 2000 by a vote of 91-4 (Roll Call 115). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3154 to S. 2521 (Military Construction Appropriations Act, 2001): To strike certain provisions which requires ground troops be withdrawn from Kosovo by a fixed date.
Vote Date: May 18, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Troops in Kosovo. This amendment would strike the provision in the military construction appropriations bill that would terminate funding for continued troop deployment in Kosovo unless Congress authorized the deployment. The provision also declared that no more than 75 percent of year 2000 supplemental spending for Kosovo could be obligated until the president certified that the European allies were paying specific percentages of the costs involved. If the administration did not certify those requirements by July 15, 2000, then the remaining money could be used only to withdraw the troops.

The amendment to strike the Kosovo provision of S. 2521 passed the Senate on May 18, 2000 by a vote of 53-47 (Roll Call 105). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3148 to S. 2521 (Military Construction Appropriations Act, 2001): To express the sense of the Senate with regard to the Million Mom March and gun safety legislation.
Vote Date: May 17, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Gun Control. This sense of the Senate vote was offered by Senator Tom Daschle (D-SD) to commend the organizers of the Million Mom March and urge Congress to give swift approval to H.R. 1501, the "Juvenile Justice Reform Act," which would increase federal control of local police through new federal programs that employ federal funds.

This sense of the Senate measure, S. 2521, passed the Senate on May 17, 2000 by a vote of 50-49 (Roll Call 104). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3127 to S. 2 (Educational Opportunities Act): To improve the bill.
Vote Date: May 9, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
"Centrist" Democrat Substitute for ESEA. This proposed substitute to the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) would increase spending on this program by $35 billion over five years. Yet this Democratic alternative was referred to by its supporters as "centrist" since it would entail block grants to the states (a GOP-favored approach), which would then allocate the money for the public schools, as opposed to allocating the money directly.

The Democrat substitute for S. 2 was rejected on May 9, 2000 by a vote of 13-84 (Roll Call 95). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3122 to S. 2 (Educational Opportunities Act): To provide for class size reduction programs.
Vote Date: May 4, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Class Size Reduction. This amendment proposed by Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) would provide $1.75 billion in 2001 for measures to reduce class size. These measures would include recruiting and hiring new teachers, testing new teachers, and providing professional development. Yet, as Senator Tim Hutchinson (R-AR) pointed out in debate, the teacher-pupil ratio has been falling for a half century, and test scores have been falling as well. Hutchinson also voiced concerns about the amendment being a step toward nationalizing education and that it would have the unintended consequence of teachers leaving the "worst schools ... to fill newly created affluent slots."

The class size reduction amendment to S. 2 was rejected by the Senate on May 4, 2000 by a vote of 44-53 (Roll Call 93). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3111 to S. 2 (Educational Opportunities Act): To improve the bill.
Vote Date: May 3, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Democrat Substitute for ESEA. This Democrat version of the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) would provide money for many programs, including $2 billion for teacher recruitment and training, $1.75 billion to hire 100,000 new teachers, and $1.3 billion in grants and loans for emergency school repairs and renovations. States would also be required to come up with accountability plans and would be held accountable for student performance.

The Democrat substitute for S. 2 was rejected on May 3, 2000 by a vote of 45-54 (Roll Call 90). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2939 to S.Con.Res. 101: To reduce the GOP tax cut by less than 1 percent in FY2001, and 1.8 percent over 5 years, to increase the Pell grant maximum by a total of $400- raising the basic Pell grant from the current $3,300 to $3,700.
Vote Date: April 7, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Increase in Pell Grants. Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA) offered this amendment to increase by $400 the maximum individual grant through the Pell program. Currently the maximum allowable grant is $3,300. The proposed increase would mean that the program would cost a total of $1.4 billion a year.

The amendment to Senate Concurrent Resolution 101 increasing Pell grants was adopted on April 7, 2000 by a vote of 51-49 (Roll Call 69). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2957 to S.Con.Res. 101: To provide a substitute.
Vote Date: April 7, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Democrat Budget Alternative. The Democrats' proposed substitute for the 2001 Budget Resolution would provide for $616 billion in discretionary spending in 2001, create a reserve fund of $40 billion over five years for Medicare prescription drug benefits, and allot $58.9 billion over five years for tax cuts. (The Republican version calls for $600.5 billion in discretionary spending, $40 billion over five years for Medicare prescription drug benefits, and $147.1 billion over five years for tax cuts.) Senator Pete Domenici (R-NM) summed up what he saw as the major difference between the two versions saying, "We think this is not the time to grow Government that much, but, rather, leave a little more ... for tax relief for the American people." This is not to say, as Domenici would argue, that the GOP version was worthy of support either; it simply was not as bad as the Democrat alternative.

The Democrats' budget substitute for Senate Concurrent Resolution 101 was rejected on April 7, 2000 by a vote of 45-55 (Roll Call 71). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3079 to S.Amdt. 2951 to S.Con.Res. 101: To express the sense of the Senate concerning an increase in the Federal minimum wage.
Vote Date: April 7, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Minimum Wage Increase. This amendment would express the sense of the Senate that the minimum wage should be increased by $1 over one year.

The minimum wage amendment to Senate Concurrent Resolution 101 passed on April 7, 2000 by a vote of 51-48 (Roll Call 76). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2962 to S.Con.Res. 101: To expand medicaid and S. CHIP coverage to low income families.
Vote Date: April 7, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Medicaid Expansion. Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA) offered this amendment to the budget resolution to eliminate $11.2 billion in tax cuts and use what he termed as "savings" to provide health insurance to the parents of children covered by Medicaid and CHIP (Children's Health Insurance Plan). Children are eligible for CHIP when their families' earnings are above the cut-off for Medicaid eligibility. Making clear that this expansion of the welfare state is "for the children," Kennedy insisted: "Parents are much more likely to enroll their children in health insurance programs, if the parents themselves can obtain coverage."

The Medicaid and CHIP expansion amendment to Senate Concurrent Resolution 101 was rejected by the Senate on April, 7, 2000 by a vote of 49-49 (Roll Call 78). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 2926 to S.Con.Res. 101: To provide funding for certain education programs.
Vote Date: April 5, 2000Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Education Funding Instead of Tax Cuts. This motion by Senator Pete Domenici (R-NM) would table (kill) Senator Jeff Bingaman's (D-NM) amendment to the 2001 Budget Resolution. Bingaman's amendment would "redirect" $28.1 billion of the tax cut provision in the bill toward a plethora of federal education programs and would eventually increase the total amount for education over five years by $34.7 billion.

The motion to kill the education amendment to Senate Concurrent Resolution 101 was passed by the Senate on April 5, 2000 by a vote of 54-46 (Roll Call 54). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On Passage of the Bill S. 2097: A bill to authorize loan guarantees in order to facilitate access to local television broadcast signals in unserved and underserved areas, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: March 30, 2000Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Television for "Underserved" Areas. This bill proposing a $1.25 billion loan guarantee program for local television in "underserved" areas is similar to House Vote (below).

[ Television for "Underserved" Areas. As a way of providing local television to 30 million households in areas of the country that cannot receive over-the-air signals or do not have local television through a satellite provider, this bill would create a new program that would provide $1.25 billion in loan guarantees to telecommunication providers. The loans would offer a competitive edge to satellite providers since cable companies cannot apply for the loans to expand their service. The loans would be administered by the Department of Agriculture's Rural Utilities Service. Representative Christopher Cox (R-CA) in floor debate asserted that the Rural Utilities Service is "writing off billions of dollars in their existing loan portfolio left and right, at taxpayer expense, and ... about 30 to 40 percent of the loans that are going to get made under this program are likely to be written off. So one can look at the cost of this program [and see that] right up front [it] is about $400 million." ]

The bill, S. 2097, passed the Senate on March 30, 2000 by a vote of 97-0 (Roll Call 50). We did not assign any pluses, since there weren't any nays.



On the Joint Resolution S.J.Res. 14: A joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States authorizing Congress to prohibit the physical desecration of the flag of the United States.
Vote Date: March 29, 2000Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Flag Desecration Constitutional Amendment. This joint resolution proposes a constitutional amendment to grant Congress the power to prohibit the physical desecration of the U.S. flag. Senator Strom Thurmond (R-SC), who argued for the amendment, stated that it would "once again give Congress the authority to protect the flag from physical desecration.... It would simply overturn a few very recent judicial decisions that rejected America's traditional approach to the flag under the law." However, if Congress truly wishes to rein in the Supreme Court with regard to flag burning, it can simply exercise its constitutional power to limit the Court's appellate jurisdiction (Article III, Section 2).

The proposed flag desecration constitutional amendment, Senate Joint Resolution 14, failed to attain the two-thirds majority required and was rejected on March 29, 2000 by a vote of 63-37 (Roll Call 48). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2872 to S. 1134 (Affordable Education Act of 2000): To establish programs to enable States and local educational agencies to place a qualified teacher in every classroom.
Vote Date: March 2, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Teacher Training. Another amendment to S. 1134, this one offered by Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA), would eliminate the education savings accounts increase provided by the bill, and would use the resulting $1.2 billion in revenue to train and recruit teachers. Under this amendment, states would be held accountable for having qualified teachers in classrooms within four years of enacting the legislation.

The teacher training/recruitment amendment to S. 1134 was rejected by the Senate on March 2, 2000 by a vote of 39-60 (Roll Call 25). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2878 to S.Amdt. 2876 to S. 1134 (Affordable Education Act of 2000): To provide a limitation regarding the policy of prohibiting social promotion.
Vote Date: March 2, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Exemptions to Achievement Standards. Senator Paul Wellstone (D-MN) offered this amendment to exempt students from proposed achievement standards if they had not been "afforded ... an opportunity to learn the material necessary to meet the State achievement standards." Vaguely worded definitions of "opportunity" would allow a multitude of exceptions to an already meddlesome proposed federal requirement for states and local school districts receiving funds to implement achievement standards.

The Wellstone amendment was rejected by the Senate on March 2, 2000 by a vote of 29-69 (Roll Call 30). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2879 to S. 1134 (Affordable Education Act of 2000): To reduce violence in schools.
Vote Date: March 2, 2000Vote: AYEBad Vote.
"Educating" about Gun Violence. The February 29, 2000 shooting of a first-grader by her classmate in Flint, Michigan, was used as fodder for this amendment proposed by Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL). The amendment would authorize up to $7 million in grants in 2001 and additional sums for the next four years to develop programs to reduce violence in schools, to indoctrinate children about the dangers of guns, and to provide violence-prevention information to children and parents.

The Durbin gun-violence amendment to S. 1134 passed the Senate on March 2, 2000 by a vote of 91-7 (Roll Call 32). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 2861 to S. 1134 (Affordable Education Act of 2000): To eliminate the use of education individual retirement accounts for elementary and secondary school expenses and to expand the incentives for the construction and renovation of public schools.
Vote Date: March 1, 2000Vote: AYEGood Vote.
School Construction. This vote concerns Senator William Roth's (R-DE) motion to kill Senator Charles Robb's (D-VA) amendment to the education savings accounts bill. Robb's amendment would provide $25 billion in federal tax credits to holders of "qualified school modernization bonds." It would also authorize $1.3 billion annually for five years in grants and zero-interest loans for school repairs. Of course, with federal money there is always a catch. As Roth stated in floor debate, "This program involves a dramatic increase in bureaucracy, while at the same time striking at the heart of local control of education...." State or local school districts would need to get the approval of the Department of Education in order to qualify for the bonds. The Department of Education then would make sure the district had completed all the surveys and studies required, and, in Roth's words, "Washington would be micromanaging a local school district's renovation plans ... second guessing the decision of state and local officials."

A motion to table (kill) the Robb amendment to S. 1134 passed the Senate on March 1, 2000 by a vote of 57-42 (Roll Call 17). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2821 to S. 1134 (Affordable Education Act of 2000): To provide for class size reduction programs.
Vote Date: March 1, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Class Size Reduction. This amendment proposed by Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) would authorize $1.2 billion in fiscal 2001 for measures to reduce class size, mainly through hiring more teachers.

The class reduction amendment to S. 1134 was rejected by the Senate on March 1, 2000 by a vote of 42-56 (Roll Call 21). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA re: Dodd Amdt No 2857): To increase funding for part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
Vote Date: February 29, 2000Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Special Education Funding. Currently, families can save $500 per year in tax-preferred accounts for education. A bill before the Senate would have allowed for an increase in that amount to $2,000 per year. However, Senator Christopher Dodd (D-CT) offered an amendment to the education savings account bill that would have disallowed that proposed increase and instead would have authorized the distribution to states over the next five years the sum of $1.2 billion for special education programs. Under the Dodd amendment, spending decisions would be made by the federal government rather than by parents who would otherwise have been able to decide for themselves how to spend the money accumulated in education savings accounts.

The Dodd special education amendment to S. 1134 was rejected by the Senate on February 29, 2000 by a vote of 44-54 (Roll Call 15). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Conference Report H.R. 3194: An act making consolidated appropriations for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2000, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: November 19, 1999Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Expanding the Welfare State. This legislation is identical to the legislation described in House Vote (below).

[ House - Welfare State Expansion. This $385 billion monstrosity constitutes a complete sellout of conservative principles to the demands of the welfare-staters at the White House. This measure would fund five regular annual appropriations bills (District of Columbia, Labor/HHS/Education, Foreign Operations, Commerce/Justice/State/Judiciary, and Interior), often at higher levels than were originally requested by the Clinton administration.

The Health and Human Services Department - the key welfare agency of the federal government - received an 11.4 percent increase in funding, more than Mr. Clinton originally requested. The Department of Education received a 6.8 percent increase in funding, also more than Mr. Clinton originally sought. Foreign aid spending was also funded at a higher level than originally sought by the President. President Clinton's federal teacher hiring initiative was granted $1.325 billion, the COPS program of federally paid law enforcement officers was awarded $595 million, and alleged "arrears" payments to the United Nations were authorized to the tune of $926 million.

Some Republicans falsely sold the bill to conservatives on the grounds that it contained a strong pro-life provision in the foreign aid section. But the bill allows President Clinton to waive the provision, a prohibition against funding international family-planning organizations, if he is willing to subtract a mere $12.5 million penalty from the $385 million population control budget. (Subsequently, this is exactly what Mr. Clinton did.) ]

The bill, the final version of H.R. 3194, was adopted by the Senate on November 19, 1999 by a vote of 74-24 (Roll Call 374). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2321 to S.Amdt. 2320 to S.Amdt. 2319 to S. 1692: To express the sense of Congress in support of the Supreme Court's decision in Roe v. Wade.
Vote Date: October 21, 1999Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Validating Roe v. Wade. This non-binding, "sense of Congress" measure would put Congress on record as stating that "Roe v. Wade was an appropriate decision," that giving mothers the ability to kill their babies in utero "secures an important constitutional right," and that Roe "should not be overturned." The 1973 Supreme Court Roe v. Wade decision was a landmark in judicial activism; it single-handedly nullified the long-standing abortion laws in 50 states without citing a single precedent for High Court jurisdiction over abortion laws. Since the Roe decision, more than 38 million unborn children have been slaughtered with legalized abortion.

This measure, a second-degree amendment to the partial birth abortion ban bill (S. 1692), was adopted by the Senate on October 21, 1999 by a vote of 51-47 (Roll Call 337). We have assigned pluses to the nays. After the second-degree Roe amendment was added to the underlying amendment, the Roe amendment was added to the bill by voice vote.



On the Conference Report H.R. 1906: A bill making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2000, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: October 13, 1999Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Agricultural Appropriations. This legislation is described under House Vote (below).

[ House - Agricultural Appropriations. This measure would appropriate $69 billion for agricultural programs, food stamps, and foreign aid programs for fiscal year 2000. The legislation represents an irresponsible 11 percent increase in spending over fiscal 1999. ]

The bill, the final version of H.R. 1906, was adopted by the Senate on October 13, 1999 by a vote of 74-26 (Roll Call 323). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Resolution of Ratification Treaty Doc. 105-28: Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty, opened for signature and signed by the United States at New York on September 24, 1996. Treaty includes two Annexes, a Protocol, and two Annexes to the Protocol
Vote Date: October 13, 1999Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. This vote is on ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), which would ban the testing of nuclear weapons by the United States. "The CTBT is a dangerous treaty which, if ratified, would do enormous harm to our national security," explained Senator Jesse Helms (R-NC). "It will not and cannot accomplish its highly exaggerated goal of halting the spread of nuclear weapons, because the CIA has repeatedly made clear that the CTBT cannot be verified. Moreover, at the same time, it would undermine America's security by undermining confidence in the safety and reliability of our nuclear arsenal."

The Senate rejected the treaty on October 13, 1999 by a vote of 48-51 (Roll Call 325). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill S. 1650: An original bill making appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2000, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: October 7, 1999Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Labor/HHS/Education Funding. This $318 billion bill is the main funding measure for the federal welfare state during fiscal 2000. The Senate big spenders not only increased the amount over fiscal 1999 by more than nine percent, they actually gave President Clinton $5.8 billion more than he requested.

The measure, S. 1650, was passed by the Senate on October 7, 1999 by a vote of 73-25 (Roll Call 321). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 1809 to S. 1650 (Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000): To increase funds for the 21st century community learning centers program.
Vote Date: September 30, 1999Vote: AYEGood Vote.
After-School Child Care. This legislation would increase by $200 million the funding for federal after-school programs. This is yet another example of a legislative initiative by senators who propose to take money from people who earned it and distribute it to people who neither earned it nor have a moral claim to the funds.
Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA), who could almost fund the entire amendment out of his family's vast wealth, supported instead a taxpayer expenditure. He suggested that Congress eliminate the one percent rate cut on the lowest income tax bracket: "If we were able to have that amount of money that would be used in the tax cut, why not take $200 million of that $792 billion and put it in after-school programs to service 370,000 children?"

The Senate voted to table the after-school funding increase, an amendment to S. 1650, on September 30, 1999 by a vote of 54-45 (Roll Call 299). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 1813 to S. 1650 (Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000): To increase funding for activities carried out under the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 1990.
Vote Date: September 30, 1999Vote: AYEGood Vote.
More Money for Federal Day Care. Senator Christopher Dodd (D-CT) proposed a measure to increase the federal day care block grant program by $817 million, raising the total to $2 billion. Like the federal after-school programs described in Senate Vote (After-School Child Care), this amendment is yet another robbery clothed in parliamentary legalese. This proposal would take $817 million from the hard-working taxpayers who earned it and distribute it to needy people who have no moral claim on the funds.

The Senate rejected a motion to table (kill) the measure, an amendment on S. 1650, on September 30, 1999 by a vote of 41-54 (Roll Call 303). We have assigned pluses to the yeas. After the tabling motion failed, the amendment was adopted by voice vote.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 1804 to S. 1650 (Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000): To specify that $1.4 billion be made available for class size reduction programs consistent with the provisions of Section 307 of Public Law 105-277.
Vote Date: September 29, 1999Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Nationalizing Education. This vote was on a measure that would allocate $1.4 billion in the pending Labor/HHS/Education appropriations bill toward President Clinton's latest socialist fancy: Hiring 100,000 teachers for local school districts from the federal till. The sickening part of the congressional debate was that both parties endorsed the erroneous notion that federal funding of education is both constitutional and a good thing, as if federal funds for education appear miraculously like manna from Heaven without first having been taken from American citizens by confiscatory taxation.

The Senate tabled (killed) the measure, an amendment to S. 1650, on September 29, 1999 by a vote of 54-44 (Roll Call 298). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Nomination PN135: 7 nominations in the Army beginning with Wesley D. Collier and ending with Thomas L. Musselman
Vote Date: August 5, 1999Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Holbrooke Nomination. This vote was on the nomination of Richard Holbrooke to be U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. Holbrooke is the author of the disastrous Dayton Accords, which sealed the fate of thousands of Serbs and produced the current, indefinite U.S. intervention in the Balkans. "I am voting against him," Senator Tim Hutchinson (R-AR) declared, "because I disagree with the policy that he has put forward in the Balkans. I just can't, in good conscience, vote for someone who I think is taking our country in the wrong direction. This is his policy: that the United States should spend billions of dollars, wear and tear on our equipment and our troops, stretching our military for a goal that I believe is not achievable."

The Senate confirmed the nomination of Richard Holbrooke on August 5, 1999 by a vote of 81-16 (Roll Call 259). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table H.R. 2466: A bill making appropriations for the Department of the Interior and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2000, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: August 5, 1999Vote: AYEBad Vote.
National Endowment for the Arts. This vote was on a measure proposed by Senator Robert Smith (R-NH) to eliminate $99 million slated for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), effectively abolishing the agency.

The U.S. Constitution does not grant to any branch of the federal government the power to fund art. Smith therefore reminded his colleagues of their oath of office. "We came here to pass laws that support the Constitution of the United States," Smith stated. "Whatever you may feel about this issue, we did not come here to pass laws about our personal beliefs.... When we swear to uphold that document, we agree to live by that vision whether we like it or not."

Sen. Smith's legislation, an amendment to H.R. 2466, was tabled (killed) by the Senate on August 5, 1999 by a vote of 80-16 (Roll Call 260). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Conference Report H.R. 2488: A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to reduce individual income tax rates, to provide marriage penalty relief, to reduce taxes on savings and investments, to provide estate and gift tax relief, to provide incentives for education savings and health care, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: August 5, 1999Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Republican Tax Cut Package. This legislation is identical that described in House Vote (below).

[ House - Republican Tax Cut Package. The Republican tax plan would implement several tax cuts over a 10-year period. The legislation would cut the income tax rate by one percent beginning in 2005, but the tax cut would sunset by 2009. The measure would also cut the capital gains rate immediately by two percentage points, eliminate the marriage penalty under income taxes (starting in 2001), and phase out estate taxes until 2009 (after which the tax would be higher than current law).

The Republican Party trumpeted this bill as being a $792 billion tax cut, and the White House lobbied furiously against it claiming that the cuts were irresponsible. But the $792 billion figure is mere political posturing, since it is not only the projected total for a 10-year period but is based on projected costs in future years. Nevertheless, the bill was better than no tax cut at all and was deserving of support. ]

The measure, the final version of H.R. 2488, was adopted by the Senate on August 5, 1999 by a vote of 50-49 (Roll Call 261). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 1510 to S.Amdt. 1499 to S. 1233 (Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000): To prohibit the use of appropriated funds for the sugar program, other than the marketing assessment.
Vote Date: August 4, 1999Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Eliminate Sugar Subsidy. This amendment would eliminate the federal sugar subsidy program, which creates import quotas, price supports, and loans to growers. Noting that the cost of this program to consumers is $1.4 billion in higher prices and higher taxes, Senator Judd Gregg (R-NH) explained that "the sugar program stifles competition. Seventeen growers get 38 percent of the benefit of this program...."

The measure, an amendment to S. 1233, was tabled (killed) by the Senate on August 4, 1999 by a vote of 66-33 (Roll Call 254). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA Re: Bingaman Amendment No.1462): To express the sense of the Senate regarding investment in education.
Vote Date: July 30, 1999Vote: NAYGood Vote.
More Federal Education Spending. This amendment would simply express the "sense of the Senate" that $132 million of the proposed 10-year tax cut should be shifted to wasteful federal education programs. The proposal untruthfully states that the tax cut it would abolish, a one percent reduction in the rate of the lowest income tax bracket, would "disproportionately benefit upper income taxpayers." Senator Tim Hutchinson (R-AR) argued against the amendment, noting that "If we do not pass the $792 billion tax relief, that money will not go toward paying down the national debt. It will, as already suggested in the speeches on the other side in the last few minutes, immediately go into more spending."

The Senate killed the measure, an amendment to S. 1429, defeating by a 48-52 vote on July 30, 1999 a waiver of a Budget Act point of order against the measure (Roll Call 232). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive the CBA Re: Kennedy Amendment No.1383): To increase the Federal minimum wage.
Vote Date: July 30, 1999Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Minimum Wage Increase. A proposal by Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA) would increase the national minimum wage by one dollar, from $5.15 per hour to $6.15 per hour. Senator Don Nickles (R-OK) opposed the amendment, observing that "we should not be passing a law in a tax cut bill to say it is against the law anywhere in the country to work for $6.10 an hour, that the federal government, in its infinite wisdom, decided if you don't have a job that pays at least $6.15 an hour you should be unemployed."

Sen. Kennedy's measure, an amendment to S. 1429, was rejected by the Senate on July 30, 1999 by a vote of 46-54 (Roll Call 239). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Discharge S.J.Res. 27: A joint resolution disapproving the extension of nondiscriminatory treatment (normal trade relations treatment) to the products of the People's Republic of China.
Vote Date: July 20, 1999Vote: NAYBad Vote.
MFN/NTR Trade with Red China. This legislation is identical to the House Vote in that it would reverse President Clinton's decision to grant China "Normal Trade Relations" (formerly Most Favored Nation status). But the Senate dispensed with the measure in a different manner, voting on whether to discharge the resolution from the Senate Finance Committee for a vote on passage instead of voting on the resolution itself.

The Senate rejected the discharge motion on the bill, S.J. Res. 27, on July 20, 1999, by a vote of 12-87 (Roll Call 213). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Motion to Discharge S.J.Res. 28: A joint resolution disapproving the extension of the waiver authority contained in section 402(c) of the Trade Act of 1974 with respect to Vietnam.
Vote Date: July 20, 1999Vote: NAYBad Vote.
Subsidized Trade with Vietnam. "Vietnam has historically not been eligible to take advantage of American taxpayer-funded programs which subsidize business deals between American companies and the Communist Government agencies in Hanoi," explained Senator Robert Smith (R-NH). "That is, until last year."

In 1998 President Clinton issued a waiver of the Jackson-Vanik law for Communist Vietnam, giving a green light to federal corporate subsidy programs beneficial to the Red regime. Sen. Smith's legislation would overturn Clinton's waiver and ban taxpayer subsidies from going to the butchers in Hanoi through programs such as the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, Export-Import Bank, and U.S. Department of Agriculture subsidy programs.

A discharge motion on Sen. Smith's bill (S. J. Res 28) would have brought the measure from the Finance Committee to the floor for a vote on passage. The Senate rejected the motion on July 20, 1999 by a vote of 5-94 (Roll Call 214). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 1200 to S. 1282 (Federal Employees Child Care Act): To prohibit the use of funds the pay for an abortion or to pay for the administrative expenses in connection with certain health plans that provide coverage for abortions.
Vote Date: July 1, 1999Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Subsidizing Abortions. This measure, an amendment to ban federal financing of employee abortions, is identical to House Vote (below). It was adopted by voice vote after a tabling motion failed.

[ House - Subsidizing Abortions. Representative Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) proposed a measure that would allow abortions to be included as medical expenses in the health care coverage the federal government subsidizes for its employees. Representative Curt Weldon (R-PA), opposing DeLauro's proposal, explained that "the unborn baby in the womb is not a potential life. It meets all of the criteria of a life, the criteria that I used to use as a practicing physician to determine whether somebody is alive or dead: a beating heart, active brain waves." ]

The tabling (killing) motion on the measure, an amendment to S. 1282, was rejected by the Senate on July 1, 1999 by a vote of 47-51 (Roll Call 197). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill S. 1234: An original bill making appropriations for foreign operations, export financing, and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2000, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: June 30, 1999Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Foreign Aid Appropriations. This $12.7 billion foreign aid appropriations bill is similar to House Vote (below).

[ House - Foreign Aid Appropriations. This legislation would appropriate $12.7 billion during fiscal 2000 for wasteful and unconstitutional foreign aid programs abroad. ]

This bill, S. 1234, was adopted by the Senate on June 30, 1999 by a vote of 97-2 (Roll Call 192). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 406 to S. 1059 (National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000): To prohibit, effective October 1, 1999, the use of funds for military operations in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) unless Congress enacts speific authorization in law for the conduct of those operations.
Vote Date: May 26, 1999Vote: AYEBad Vote.
End Aggression Against Yugoslavia. Senator Robert Smith (R-NH) proposed a measure to prohibit military aggression by the U.S. government against Yugoslavia after October 1, 1999. Unlike Senator Specter's amendment (below), this measure would require an end to the air war as well. Sen. Smith noted: "Every single person out there who has a son or daughter old enough to serve in the military should ask themselves: Is it worth my son's or daughter's life to die in Yugoslavia for a humanitarian crisis that does not involve the national security of the United States?"

[ Specter's amendment - Combat Troops to Yugoslavia. A proposal by Senator Arlen Specter (R-PA) would prohibit any funds in the Defense Department authorization bill from being used to introduce combat troops into Yugoslavia, including Kosovo. The measure would exempt "peacekeeping" police forces from the prohibition, and would therefore act mainly as a prohibition against a military invasion. Sen. Specter explained that the measure "is designed to uphold the Constitution of the United States, which grants the exclusive authority to declare war to the Congress of the United States." ]

Senator Smith's proposal, an amendment to S. 1059, was tabled (killed) by the Senate on May 26, 1999 by a vote of 77-21 (Roll Call 151). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 383 to S. 1059 (National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000): To direct the President, pursuant to the United States Constitution and the War Powers Resolution, to seek approval from Congress prior to the introduction of ground troops from the United States Armed Forces in connection with present operations against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia or funding for that operations will not be authorized.
Vote Date: May 25, 1999Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Combat Troops to Yugoslavia. A proposal by Senator Arlen Specter (R-PA) would prohibit any funds in the Defense Department authorization bill from being used to introduce combat troops into Yugoslavia, including Kosovo. The measure would exempt "peacekeeping" police forces from the prohibition, and would therefore act mainly as a prohibition against a military invasion. Sen. Specter explained that the measure "is designed to uphold the Constitution of the United States, which grants the exclusive authority to declare war to the Congress of the United States."

Senator Specter's proposal, an amendment to S. 1059, was tabled (killed) by the Senate on May 25, 1999 by a vote of 52-48 (Roll Call 145). We have assigned pluses to the nays.