Name: Carte Goodwin


Senate: West Virginia, Democrat


Cumulative Freedom Index Score: 0%


Status: Former Member of the Senate

Score Breakdown:
0% (111th Congress: 2009-2010)

Key Votes:



On the Cloture Motion S. 3628: A bill to amend the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to prohibit foreign influence in Federal elections, to prohibit government contractors from making expenditures with respect to such elections, and to establish additional disclosure requirements with respect to spending in such elections, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: September 23, 2010Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Campaign Finance Disclosure. Back on June 24, 2010, the House passed the DISCLOSE Act ("Campaign Finance Disclosure"), H.R. 5175, which would establish new regulations for corporations, unions, and advocacy and lobbying groups for campaign-related activities.

A companion DISCLOSE bill, S. 3628, was introduced in the Senate on July 21, 2010.

The Senate failed to invoke cloture (limiting debate and allowing for a vote) on the motion to proceed to the DISCLOSE Act, S. 3628, on September 23, 2010 by a vote of 59-39 (Roll Call 240). Sixty votes are required to invoke cloture. We have assigned pluses to the nays because invoking cloture would have permitted a vote on, and certain passage of, the unconstitutional DISCLOSE Act to restrict the free speech rights of corporations, unions, and special interest groups.



On the Cloture Motion S. 3454: An original bill to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2011 for military activities of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for defense activities of the Department of Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: September 21, 2010Vote: AYEBad Vote.
DREAM Act. The Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act of 2009 would, as described by Congressional Quarterly, "provide a pathway to citizenship for children of illegal immigrants who attend college or join the military." This act would provide amnesty for up to 2.1 million children of illegal immigrants. It would also permit states to offer them in-state tuition rates.

The DREAM Act was first introduced in the Senate in 2001. Although it was voted down as a stand-alone measure in the Senate in 2007, pro-amnesty forces have continued to promote its passage. Since the DREAM Act had not been brought up for a stand-alone vote in this session, Democratic leaders attempted to add it as an amendment to the fiscal 2011 defense authorization bill (S. 3454) by scheduling a pre-election cloture vote on proceeding to the defense bill with a limitation that only three amendments could be considered: (1) the DREAM Act; (2) a limitation on Senators' use of secret holds on bills or nominations; and (3) striking the defense bill's repeal of the 1993 "don't ask, don't tell" law. Although the DREAM Act shared billing with two other amendments, it was clear that the DREAM Act, with its obvious implications for wooing the Hispanic vote, was the centerpiece of this pre-election cloture vote.

The Senate failed to invoke cloture (limiting debate and allowing a vote) on the motion to proceed to the defense authorization bill on September 21, 2010 by a vote of 56-43 (Roll Call 238). Sixty votes are required to invoke cloture. We have assigned pluses to the nays because invoking cloture would have permitted a vote on, and likely approval of, the DREAM Act amendment to provide amnesty to certain groups of illegal immigrants.



On the Cloture Motion S.Amdt. 4596 to S.Amdt. 4595 to S.Amdt. 4594 to H.R. 5297: To repeal the expansion of information reporting requirements for payments of $600 or more to corporations, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: September 14, 2010Vote: NAYBad Vote.
ObamaCare 1099 Requirement. One of the most unpopular provisions in the massively unconstitutional ObamaCare law is the requirement for businesses to file 1099 forms with their vendors and the IRS for any purchases totaling more than $600 per year with a vendor. This will force 40 million business entities to file untold billions of new reports with their vendors and the IRS each year.

Pressure has been building on Congress to repeal the 1099 reporting requirement. On September 14 the Senate considered an amendment by Senator Mike Johanns (Neb.) to repeal this requirement.

The Senate failed to invoke cloture (limiting debate and allowing a vote) on the Johanns amendment on September 14, 2010 by a vote of 46-52 (Roll Call 231). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because invoking cloture would have permitted a vote on an amendment to repeal the highly unpopular 1099 IRS reporting provision of the unconstitutional ObamaCare law.



On the Motion (Motion to Concur in the House Amendment to the Senate Amendment to H.R. 1586 with Amendment No. 4575.): An act to modernize the air traffic control system, improve the safety, reliability, and availability of transportation by air in the United States, provide for modernization of the air traffic control system, reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: August 5, 2010Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Medicaid and Education Assistance. This legislation (H.R. 1586) would provide $26.1 billion in state aid for Medicaid ($16.1 billion of the total) and education ($10 billion). The latter is for the purpose of creating or retaining education-related jobs.

The Senate agreed to this legislation on August 5, 2010 by a vote of 61-39 (Roll Call 228). We have assigned pluses to the nays because the federal government has no constitutional authority to pay for healthcare for the poor or to fund education. Also, there is no statistical evidence showing that federal involvement in education has increased learning -- though it certainly has increased federal bureaucracy and control.



On the Nomination PN1768: Elena Kagan, of Massachusetts, to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
Vote Date: August 5, 2010Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Kagan Confirmation. The Senate confirmed President Obama's nomination of Elena Kagan to be an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court on August 5, 2010 by a vote of 63-37 (Roll Call 229).

We have assigned pluses to the nays because Kagan is not committed to adhering to the original intent of the Constitution in her judicial decisions. Instead, her public record indicates that she is a legal positivist who will interpret law based on her own ideological bent and effectively revise and rewrite law by judicial fiat.



On the Motion (DeMint Motion to Suspend Rule 22 Re: Motion to Refer House Message on H.R. 4213 to the Committee on Finance): A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to extend certain expiring provisions, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: July 21, 2010Vote: NAYBad Vote.
Estate Tax. During consideration of a bill to extend unemployment benefits (H.R. 4213), Sen. Jim DeMint (S.C.) offered a measure to submit the bill to the Finance Committee with instructions to include language to permanently repeal the estate tax. Under current law, the estate tax, which expired at the end of 2009 after being incrementally reduced, will rise to 55 percent next year with an exemption of $1 million. The estate tax often forces the sale of family farms and other businesses that owners want to bequeath to their children.

A motion to allow for a vote on DeMint's measure was rejected on July 21, 2010 by a vote of 39-59 (Roll Call 213). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because the estate tax should be permanently eliminated.



On the Motion (DeMint Motion to Suspend Rule 22 Re: DeMint Amdt. No. 4464): A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to extend certain expiring provisions, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: July 21, 2010Vote: NAYBad Vote.
Arizona Immigration Law. During consideration of the bill to extend unemployment benefits (H.R. 4213), Sen. Jim DeMint (S.C.) offered a measure to recommit the bill to the Judiciary Committee with instructions to include language that no funds in any provision of law may be used to participate in a lawsuit against Arizona's immigration law. The Obama administration opposes the Arizona law (S.B. 1070) despite the fact that it does not actually create new powers of government but instead makes illegal under state law the illegal immigration that is already illegal under federal law.

A motion to allow for a vote on DeMint's measure was rejected on July 21, 2010 by a vote of 43-55 (Roll Call 214). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because Arizona (like any other state) has the right to stem the tide of illegal immigration into the state.