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Shadows of PowerMany Americans still scoff at the idea of a conspiratorial interpretation of ongoing events. The Shadows of Power by James Perloff demonstrates that they scoff at their own peril.

For many years, debates over “affirmative action” programs for blacks going to college have focused on “fairness” when they probably should have centered on “worth.”

Mark Levin’s new book, The Liberty Amendments, which calls for an Article V constitutional convention, ignores the very real risks of harmful changes to the Constitution.

In his new book, The Thistle and the Drone, author and professor Akbar Ahmed reveals how the War on Terror is in reality a war on tribal Islam.

A review of the provocative new book by Tim and Chuck Baldwin.

President Obama's secret CIA hit squad is detailed in Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Mark Mazzetti's book The Way of the Knife.

Predictive AnalyticsIn light of recent revelations of wholesale spying on American citizens by the National Security Agency (NSA), significant media attention has focused on not only how much data is being collected and under what authority it was being collected in the first place, but on the potential uses of that crucial private information by the agents of the federal surveillance state.

In his timely book on the subject, Predictive Analytics, author Eric Siegel reveals the power and peril of predictive analytics.

The new book Deep State by Marc Ambinder and D.B. Grady reads like an encomium rather an indictment of the federal government's secret activities.

 

 

 

Liberty: The God That FailedAuthor Christopher Ferrara’s main target, as indicated by the title of his book, is Liberty. He states: “America was the place where Liberty finally replaced what the Christian religion had once wrought in social order: the alliance of altar and throne.” But it isn’t liberty that has been failing in America; it is license.

Glenn Beck's latest book, Control: Exposing the Truth About Guns, exposes plenty of the myths being promoted by the "controllists" as he calls them, but precious little about the motivations and purposes behind those "controllists." Readers looking for that will have to go elsewhere.

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