George W. Bush tells us several times in Decision Points how fond he is of humor, but obviously some of his jokes have not gone over well. There is no mention in the former President's memoir of his "search" under tables and chairs at a White House Correspondents Dinner for those weapons of mass destruction that were never found in Iraq.

NarniaThe Chronicles of Narnia, by C.S. Lewis, is a treasure trove of timeless Christian truths able to edify, enlighten, educate, and entertain both children and adults alike.

For decades constitutionalists of all stripes (read: Tea Partiers, Tenthers, etc.) have mourned the demise of our constitutional republic. They feel that despite their often heroic (and unheralded) efforts to fend off the near constant attacks on our founding charter by the enemies of limited government, the vigorous eradication of the first principles of liberty continues unabated.

Free-Range KidsFree-Range Kids: Giving Our Children the Freedom We Had Without Going Nuts With Worry, by Lenore Skenazy, Jossey-Bass Publishers (a Wiley Imprint): San Francisco, Calif., 2009, 256 pages, hardcover, $24.99.

The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future (Or, Don’t Trust Anyone Under 30), by Mark Bauerlein, Penguin Publishers: New York, 2009, 270 pages, paperback, $15.95.

Just How Stupid Are We? Facing the Truth About the American Voter, by Rick Shenkman, Basic Books (Perseus Book Group): New York, 2009, 242 pages, paperback, $14.95.

Cathy Gere’s new book, Knossos and the Prophets of Modernism, is of profound significance because it offers the reader an opportunity to examine the manner in which modern and post-modern ideological constructions have hijacked the archaeological study of ancient Crete in the service of various agendas.