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Heaven is for Real is a heartwarming story about an incredible happening. The film adaptation of Todd Burpo’s best-selling book of the same title describes his son’s story about encountering the afterlife at the age of four as well as the profound effect this story has had on others. With a talented cast and amazing story driving it forward, the movie is sure to move audiences and have them running to their local bookstore to buy the book, both the adult and children’s versions.

The latest Marvel Comic-turned-movie, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, has not only entertained huge audiences, it has won the opprobrium of neoconservative hawks globally for its biting critique of the surveillance/drone state.

The movie God's Not Dead, while not a cinematic masterpiece, has some high points and should definitely cause viewers to start a needed societal discussion.

Paramount’s film Noah is based on the Biblical story of Noah and the Ark. The film admittedly takes “creative license,” but according to the disclaimer from its trailers, it remains “true to the essence, values, and integrity of a story that is a cornerstone of faith for millions of people worldwide.”

In the dystopian world of Divergent, everyone must choose one of five paths on their 16th birthday, and those who are deemed "Divergent" from the established system are in grave danger.

Son of GodIn its opening weekend, Mark Burnett and Roma Downey’s new Son of God film topped $26.5 million, to mixed reviews.

In spite of some flaws toward the end, RoboCop is a fresh take on its 1987 predecessor and a perfect alternative to all the sappy romances that flooded the screens this weekend.

Monuments MenIn Monuments Men, a rag tag team of art scholars turned soldiers attempt to rescue priceless artwork stolen by the Nazis. But the question naturally arises: Is the Mona Lisa worth a single life?

Lone Survivor, directed by Peter Berg and starring Mark Wahlberg, is a stirring testament to the brotherhood of our armed forces and well worth your time. Rated R for strong bloody war violence and pervasive language, it is not for the faint of heart. 

 

 

 

 

It’s impossible to surmise what J. R. R. Tolkien’s shade might think about the latest big screen adaptation of his fantasy corpus set in a fictional Middle Earth of elves, hobbits, orcs, and rings of power. But New Zealand director Peter Jackson’s latest cinematic tour de force, The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, is undeniably a very different story than its simple, warm-hearted literary source material.

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