Adjustment BureauMatt Damon’s newest film, The Adjustment Bureau, questions the basis and validity of free will. Is man’s destiny truly in his own hands, or is his destiny in the hands of a higher power (God)? Is it one or the other — or both? The film also emphasizes the issues of sacrifice and liberty (but what is liberty — does it include trying to evade God’s plans for you?), marking it as yet another hit film to add to Damon’s lengthy roster.

OscarSunday night's 83rd Annual Academy Awards proved to be relatively entertaining. With a number of wonderful musical performances and compelling tributes, to the honoring of some worthy films, this year’s Academy Awards rightfully earned better ratings than in recent years.

If you prefer the charm of hand-drawn animation to the computer-generated sort, you’ll love The Illusionist. The primary character, an aging and outdated European magician named Tatischeff, plays one-night gigs traveling from town to town and country to country, often being cheated by his employers. Eventually he crosses paths with Alice, a teenager who plays at being grownup, and who believes him to be the magician he once was. Their ensuing adventure together is both humorous and haunting. The movie is enchantingly slow-paced, and the animation and sound styles create a nearly perfect stage for this character-driven story.

The new children's movie Gnomeo & Juliet is  of course an adaptation of William Shakespeare’s classic work, Romeo & Juliet. In this new world, the bickering enemies are red and blue garden gnomes. The blue garden belongs to the Montagues of 2B and the red Capulets live next door, at not 2B.

The King’s Speech, a period piece set in the 1930s, portrays the story of Prince Albert (Bertie), the man who would never be King, and his relationship with Lionel Logue, a speech therapist, which would later become a lifelong friendship. Bertie’s older brother, David, is first in line for the British throne, and thank goodness, because Bertie suffers from a terrible stammer unsuitable for a public life that now involves not just looking good, but also sounding good. The latter thanks to the new-fangled invention called the “wireless.”

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