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FireproofIt has to be more than obvious to any casual observer that many marriages these days are in trouble. The high rates of separation and divorce lead one to conclude that many couples no longer respect and obey the enduring “until death do us part,” portion of their marriage vows, even though most contracted them in front of, and asked blessings from, God. It’s also glaringly obvious that some couples cannot distinguish between lust and love, entering into marriages that are doomed to failure when the lust runs out. And some are just plain in love with the idea of having a wedding, being caught up in the sights, sounds, trimmings, and festivities of the event, blind to the realities of the future: the duties, dignity, and sanctity of a life-long commitment ordained by God.

I.O.U.S.A. Movie PosterThe August 21 premiere of I.O.U.S.A. in select theaters across the country included not only the film itself but a live broadcast of a panel discussion arranged by the I.O.U.S.A. sponsors. Translating the marketing euphemisms used in the discussion, Americans should brace for two proposed solutions to our debt crisis: higher payroll taxes (disguised as "automatic savings") and rationed healthcare (part of a national budget).

I.O.U.S.A. Movie PosterThe new documentary film I.O.U.S.A. sounds the alarm about our worsening debt crisis but is short on solutions.

Indiana JonesNostalgia for previous Indiana Jones productions guaranteed that the fourth film in this series would be a box-office success. Starring an aging Harrison Ford, the two-hour, action-packed Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull starts in Nevada, visits a mythical U.S. university, takes the viewers to Peru, and winds up back at the university where “Indy” is a professor of anthropology. Filled with an almost never-ending string of improbable escapes from capture and death, the Spielberg-Lucas production doesn’t disappoint lovers of adventure fantasies. However, its portrayal of Soviet forces as brutal savages in a major Hollywood action flick is unique.

Demographic WinterIf you’re like most alive today, you grew up with Paul R. Ehrlich’s Malthusian idea of a “population bomb.” It just seems like common sense that man will increase his numbers inexorably until, one day, we find ourselves living a real-life Soylent Green scenario, sans drama and Charlton Heston to sound that indelible alarm about the real source of a futuristic, overpopulated world’s food supply, “Soylent Green is people!”

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