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A California doctor treks around the world in 40 days to uncover the tragic consequences of banning DDT.

Copperhead, scheduled for release June 28, is based on the 19th-century novel of the same name by Harold Frederic. Dairy farmer Abner Beech opposes the war waged by President Abraham Lincoln in the name of preservation of the Union. Like other peace Democrats in the North, he is disparagingly called a “Copperhead” — a venomous snake — by ardent supporters of the war who view his stand as unpatriotic and even treasonous.

This is the third film by director Ron Maxwell set during the Civil War.

Star Trek Into Darkness may feel, to some moviegoers, as if it treks into darkness, as it is at times convoluted. The movie seems to have multiple beginnings and multiple ends, and the sequences can be a bit tricky to follow. But the film does address a number of poignant points that have easy comparisons to our contemporary history and to the Christian faith, and for those reasons, the film is redeemed. Plus, one cannot simply ignore some of the more exciting and entertaining moments that will keep moviegoers engaged.

Baz Luhrmann’s direction of The Great Gatsby wonderfully depicts on screen the grandeur that epitomizes the setting throughout F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic novel in a way that is emblematic of his touch. The root of the story is money and its seemingly infinite power — and, perhaps more importantly — its illusory nature. The film does a fairly good job of capturing that crux and running with it in a way that would likely have made Fitzgerald proud of the effort.

 

"I don't know who he is and I don't know where he is, but he's coming," Branch Rickey declares in the opening scene of 42, the highly acclaimed motion picture about Jackie Robinson's breaking of the color barrier in organized baseball.

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