Nouri al-Maliki has stepped down as the president of Iraq, and Haider al-Abadi’s emergence as the nation’s leader will undoubtedly lead to more military assistance from the United States.

As is the case with every tragic gun death, the accidental shooting of an Arizona firearms instructor is being accompanied by irrational calls for more government intrusion into our lives.

The devastation visited upon Yazidis, Kurds, and Christians is a consequence of U.S. foreign policy.

Though racial discrimination exists, it is nowhere near the barrier it once was. The relevant question is: How much of what we see today can be explained by racial discrimination?

The first reports out of Ferguson seemed ideal to stir up the mob, but thanks to the alternative media in this country the “other side” of the story came out.

There are several reasons not to intervene militarily in another country’s conflict, even modestly. One is the potential for mission creep.

The political left has been campaigning against the use of force since at least the 18th century. So it is not surprising that they are now arguing that heavily armed or aggressive police forces only inflame protesters and thus provoke violence.

If we can't be bothered to stop and think, instead of repeating pat phrases, don't expect to live under the rule of law. Do you prefer the rule of the media and/or the mob?

Even those of us who are used to seeing politics get pretty tough and dirty are startled by Governor Rick Perry's August 15 indictment by a grand jury on two counts of abusing his office.

The rise of the brutal Islamic State, with its unspeakable violence against innocents, is an appalling but unsurprising outcome of the last 100 years, including seven decades of neocolonialist American intervention.

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