Jack KerwickOn June 10, I turned 40 years old.

Much has changed since 1972, both in my own life as well as in the world.

Forty years ago, President Richard Nixon presided over America.

We were still engaged in the Vietnam War. 

The median price of a home was $27,600.  The average car cost $3,853, and the average income was $11,859.

Watching the television pundits fret over campaign finance is amusing, because the solution to their problem is right under their noses. They just don’t want to see it.

As long as government has the power to sell privileges, people will spend big bucks to influence elections. The wealthy and well connected will always have better access to government than regular people.

As the kites in Ocean City, New Jersey, became airborne, protesters on the boardwalk waved American flags and told the pro-wind crowd to go fly a kite while unfurling banners with slogans such as “Global Wind Power, Another Wacko Idea.”

Politicians seem to have a special fondness for words that have two very different meanings, so we are likely to hear a lot of these kinds of words this election year.

"Access" is one of those words. Politicians seem to be forever coming to the rescue of people who have been denied "access" to credit, college or whatever.

But what does that mean, concretely?

Obama's activities at this past weekend's "Gay Pride" parades in cities such as New York, Chicago, and San Francisco, prove again that the Democrats are no longer the party of the common man. They are now the party of the uncommon man.

This year the nefarious goings-on included an invasion by hordes of Barack Obama campaign staffers, who zealously plied the fertile recruiting grounds that are the parades. In fact, writes the New York Times, “The parades could have been confused for Obama campaign rallies. In Chicago on Sunday, 300 of his campaign staff members and volunteers marched down Halsted Street through the heart of the gay district to chants of ‘Four more years! Four more years!’"