Since so many in the media cannot resist turning every tragedy into a political talking point, it was perhaps inevitable that (1) someone would try to link the shooting rampage at the Batman movie in Colorado to the Tea Party, and that (2) some would try to make it a reason to impose more gun control laws.

Jack KerwickAs I write this, the news is a buzz with the massacre that occurred in Aurora, Colorado, during the midnight opening show of The Dark Knight Rises — the third and (allegedly) final installment of Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy.

Reportedly, approximately 20 minutes into the film, a man who, donned as he was with a gas mask, was eerily reminiscent of the film’s arch villain, entered the theater and began to wreak unimaginable havoc with explosives and a gun.

When it was all said and done, 12 innocent people had been murdered and dozens more injured.

Everyone wants to know why 24-year-old James Holmes, the killer in the movie theater in Aurora, Colorado, randomly shot over 70 people, killing 12 innocent moviegoers. Why did he do it? What was his motive? What drove him to massacre so many people he didn’t know, including children? The answer will never be provided by the psychologists, or the media, or the government. Most of them are too unwilling to figure out why these massacres are taking place. And if they knew the answer, they would not want the public to know it.

But since I am old enough to remember a time in America when such massacres were unheard of, I suspect that I know why our society is creating young sociopaths with the urge to kill. It has something to do with our atheist education system and the nihilist morals they now teach

Barack Obama's great rhetorical gifts include the ability to make the absurd sound not only plausible, but inspiring and profound.

His latest verbal triumph was to say on July 13th, "if you've been successful, you didn't get there on your own." As an example, "Somebody invested in roads and bridges. If you've got a business — you didn't build that. Somebody else made that happen."

Did the taxpayers, including business taxpayers, not pay for that road when it was built? Why should they have to pay for it twice?

Rev. Jeremiah Wright told Ed Klein (author of The Amateur: Barack Obama in the White House) that, back in 2008,  Barack Obama had asked him to refrain from controversial remarks while he ran for President. Wright said he told Obama he couldn’t make that promise. He said Obama then told him, “The problem with you, Rev, is that you’ve got to tell the truth.”