Don't be fooled by Bill Clinton's candor about Mitt Romney and Bain Capital. There's something that always comes first in the Clintons' universe, and it's not the country.

By now we’ve had about 40 years of death education in the public schools, and the subject has metastasized throughout the entire curriculum as the National Education Association has played an active role in promoting it.

Democrats and Republicans do have certain similarities, but are they really the same? Well, to believe so is like thinking that Mother Teresa and Mullah Omar are the same because they're both religious.

 

Words such as "autism" and "poor" are redefined in misleading ways to justify draining more money from the public in taxes, expanding the government, and allowing politicians to give handouts to people who are expected to vote for their reelection.

Death educators are quite aware that they are dealing with a highly charged, taboo subject that many students can’t handle. But they are more concerned with making death education more “effective” than investigating the possibility that death education — effective or ineffective — is a contributing cause of teen suicide. The statistics alone should elicit some curiosity and interest, if not alarm. In 1960 there were about 1,000 teenage suicides; in 1984 about 5,000.

And now death education has even been introduced into kindergarten classes. It's well known that children are highly suggestible. Several years ago in Canton, Michigan, an 8-year-old boy was shown a suicide film in his second-grade class, in which a depressed child tries to hang himself. Less than 24 hours later, the 8-year-old, mimicking the boy in the movie, hanged himself in his own bedroom. (When parents later sued the school, the second-grade teachers destroyed their lesson plans.)