Walter WilliamsThe late South African economist William Hutt, in his 1964 book, The Economics of the Colour Bar, said that one of the supreme tragedies of the human condition is that those who have been the victims of injustices and oppression "can often be observed to be inflicting not dissimilar injustices upon other races."

David Rockefeller, in his 2002 autobiography, Memoirs, assures us that there is no secret conspiracy to create a world government. While he proudly admits to being an internationalist, he insists that there is no secret plan to lead this country into some sort of world superstate. He also insists that those of us who believe in such a conspiracy are really the victims of “populist paranoia.” Let his words speak for themselves:

In response to a MetLife poll and a Transportation for America (TFA) survey, both published this month, a federal program is under consideration for “Fixing the Mobility Crisis Threatening the Baby Boom Generation.”

Thomas SowellOne of my earliest memories of revulsion against war came from seeing a photograph from the First World War when I was a teenager. It was nothing gory. Just a picture of a military officer, in an impressive uniform, talking to a puzzled and forlorn-looking old peasant woman with a cloth wrapped around her head.

Way back in 1947 there was a movie filmed entitled Miracle on 34th Street, in which a Santa Claus in a New York department store brought happiness to a little boy. I don’t remember the plot, but I remember the name of the movie and that it had a happy ending.

Log in