Ralph ReilandYou knew it was coming.

First they came for the cigarettes, then Hank Williams Jr. got knocked off Monday Night Football for not being politically correct, and now they’re coming for the butter.

Within the last few years, a phenomenon emerged to become among the most formidable forces in contemporary American politics. It goes by the name of “the Tea Party movement.” 

Supposedly, the Tea Party movement is not affiliated with either of our two national political parties. Rather, it is composed of millions of ordinary Americans who, jealous as they are of the liberties bequeathed to them by their progenitors, find intolerable the gargantuan proportions to which the federal government has grown. 

One of the evil fruits of the tree of evolution is the idea of eugenics, the notion that human beings can be bred to perfection by the same methods used to breed perfect cattle. Since evolution itself reduces man to the level of animal, it is not surprising that eugenics was adopted by many leaders among the educational elite as the means of solving man’s social problems. But eugenics itself poses a problem: what does one mean by human perfection, and whose definition of perfection should be adopted?

We’ve all heard about the tactic of using children as human shields, as practiced by Saddam Hussein, the Taliban and others. The idea is that you place civilians — preferably women and children — at military targets to reduce the chances that your enemy will attack and so that, if he does, he’ll look like a heartless miscreant who targets the least among us. Morally, it’s the least of tactics.

Nobody in the Western world has been willing to admit that it is the socialist policies of their governments that have led to the dire economic problems the world now faces. Sir Mervyn King, governor of the Bank of England, revealed how severe the crisis is after the decision was made by the bank’s Monetary Policy Committee to put 75 billion of newly created money into the economy in a desperate effort to stave off a new credit crisis and a UK recession.