Among many on the Right, the belief that their opponents on the Left are “moral relativists” dies hard. But die it must, for not only is this not true, it is about as far from the truth as it can get.

Walter WilliamsThere are a lot of things, large and small, that irk me. One of them is our tendency to evaluate a presidential candidate based on his intelligence or academic credentials. When Obama threw his hat in the ring, people thought he was articulate and smart and hailed his intellectual credentials. Just recently, when Newt Gingrich announced his candidacy, people hailed his intellectual credentials and smartness as well.

Readers of this column will notice that I tend to be more critical of Republicans and “conservatives” than I am of Democrats and leftists. My reason for this is not difficult to grasp. Simply put, a wolf recognized by all as such, while dangerous, isn’t nearly as dangerous as a wolf in sheep’s clothing. My objective is to pull back the wool that Republicans have been throwing over our eyes for far too long.

Amtrak trains make passes by my office a few times day as they travel to and from Niagara Falls and points north, including Toronto. Despite the fact that the Falls is one of the most popular tourism destinations on the planet and the rail system stretches across an international border to a region ripe with economic activity, it’s very rare that I see anyone in the passenger cars. It’s patently obvious that public transportation via rail is unpopular, if not useless, in the United States.

Thomas SowellTwo unrelated news stories on the same day show the contrast between government decisions and private decisions.