I recently had the pleasure of perusing a number of old magazines from the mid-nineteenth century to about 1918. They included such great monthly periodicals as Scribner’s, Harper’s, McClure’s, and others. All of them had well-written articles on a wide variety of subjects, reflecting the eclectic tastes of their readers. American readers wanted more than just entertainment. There was a voracious hunger for knowledge, and these magazines provided it, along with wonderful illustrations.

As we were reminded over the past weekend, there are already an impressive number of schools and government buildings, as well as streets, avenues, highways, parkways, turnpikes, and boulevards named after Ronald Reagan. They may be found in 11 states and in the District of Columbia, where Washington National Airport was renamed Reagan National Airport in 1998.

You might think a guy who’s sponged off us all his life, first for his education and then for every paycheck since, would keep his mouth shut lest we notice his bloodsucking — and that if he opened it at all, it would be for a succinct but heartfelt, “Thanks, chumps.”

Walter WilliamsSam Kazman's "Drug Approvals and Deadly Delays" article in the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons (Winter 2010), tells a story about how the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's policies have led to the deaths of tens of thousands of Americans. Let's look at how it happens.

Thomas SowellNow that two different federal courts have declared ObamaCare unconstitutional, the administration's answer is to call the courts guilty of "judicial activism."