Selwyn DukeIf anyone should feel loved right now, it’s social commentator Juan Williams. His firing by National Public Radio (NPR) for comments he made on Fox News’ O’Reilly Factor has drawn harsh criticism from all quarters, left, right and center. And I join this defensive phalanx. Sacking a man for saying that he gets “worried” and “nervous” aboard a plane when he see people “identifying themselves first and foremost as Muslims” with their traditional garb is an example of political correctness run amuck. Heck, Williams was merely giving voice to a disquiet felt by a majority of Americans.

Thomas SowellAmong longtime politicians who are being seriously challenged for the first time this election year, Congressman Barney Frank of Massachusetts best epitomizes the cynical ruthlessness which hides behind their lofty rhetoric.

Some policies, laws, constitutional principles and traditions are about common sense.

Becky AkersYou, too, may have received this email or one of its variants: the subject heading reads: “This is NYC on Madison Ave,” while the body contains pictures showing scores of Muslim men kneeling to pray in the streets — so many, in fact, that they fill the pavement from curb to curb. The legend below the pictures complains, “A Christian Nation cannot put up a Christmas scene of the baby Jesus in a public place, but the Muslims can stop normal traffic every Friday afternoon by worshiping in the streets....  Scary! Isn't it? … This is an accurate picture of every Friday afternoon in several locations throughout NYC….”

Thomas SowellYou would be hard pressed to find a politician who is less frank than Congressman Barney Frank. Even in an occupation where truth and candor are often lacking, Congressman Frank is in a class by himself when it comes to rewriting history in creative ways. Moreover, he has a lot of history to rewrite in his re-election campaign this year.