Walter WilliamsOne tragedy of war is that its victors write its history and often do so with bias and dishonesty. That's true about our War of 1861, erroneously called a civil war. Civil wars, by the way, are when two or more parties attempt to take over the central government. Jefferson Davis no more wanted to take over Washington, D.C. than George Washington, in 1776, wanted to take over London. Both wars were wars of independence.

Thomas SowellGuess who said the following: "We have tried spending money. We are spending more than we have ever spent before and it does not work." Was it Sarah Palin? Rush Limbaugh? Karl Rove?

Jack KennyOld war hawks never die, they just beat new war drums. Columnist David Broder, New Dealer emeritus at the Washington Post, believes he has discovered the elixir for our stubbornly stagnant economy, one that has the potential to make Barack Obama "one of the most successful presidents in history." And, oh yes, it will be good for the country, too. Heck, it worked for FDR, didn't it?

Thomas SowellMost elections are about particular policies, particular scandals or particular personalities. But these issues don't mean as much this year — not because they are not important, but because this election is a crossroads election, one that can decide what path this country will take for many years to come.

Sam BlumenfeldIn a way, the history of National Public Radio, now known simply as NPR, follows the slow, incremental creep of America toward socialism. Created by the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, it was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson, a liberal Democrat who beat Barry Goldwater in a crucial presidential race. One should not forget that it was also the Johnson administration that gave us federal funding for education, the War on Poverty, Medicare and Medicaid, and the Gun Control Act of 1968.