“Rather go to bed without dinner than to rise in debt,” advised Benjamin Franklin.

That’s not how the Greeks seem to see things, where Franklin’s advice on borrowing and debt is likely to be swapped for an ethos that’s more in tune with short-term satisfaction and long-run deficits.

We call the war of 1861 the Civil War. But is that right? A civil war is a struggle between two or more entities trying to take over the central government. Confederate President Jefferson Davis no more sought to take over Washington, D.C., than George Washington sought to take over London in 1776. Both wars, those of 1776 and 1861, were wars of independence. Such a recognition does not require one to sanction the horrors of slavery. We might ask, How much of the war was about slavery?

When Mohammad Youssuf Abdulazeez rammed his car through the gate at the Navy Operational Support Center and Marine Corps Reserve Center in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and opened fire, the people he shot couldn’t defend themselves. Thanks to a 23-year-old Department of Defense policy, they were unarmed.

The crimes committed by the Nazi regime were real, painful, and a stain against humanity. Unfortunately, the Nazis were not the only terror regime that killed millions. Similar or worse atrocities were carried out by various Communist regimes. The lives of tens of millions were snuffed out in Communist China, Communist Soviet Union, and numerous Soviet satellite nations. However, none of the criminals who murdered these millions has faced trial and prosecution.

The victors of war write its history in order to cast themselves in the most favorable light. That explains the considerable historical ignorance about our war of 1861 and panic over the Confederate flag.

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