The beheading of a second American journalist has convinced a majority of Americans that the jihadist terrorists known as the Islamic State pose a significant threat to the United States. And they want this country to do something about it.

If one cannot contract Ebola, as the CDC claims, except through exchange of bodily fluids, then why were millions of dollars spent transporting Ebola patients Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol from Liberia to a U.S. hospital under extreme isolation procedures?

What the Archbishop of Mosul has already experienced does not have to happen elsewhere. But, to avoid such a fate, realization of an actual threat that could be duplicated in other countries will have to take hold.

Nouri al-Maliki has stepped down as the president of Iraq, and Haider al-Abadi’s emergence as the nation’s leader will undoubtedly lead to more military assistance from the United States.

As is the case with every tragic gun death, the accidental shooting of an Arizona firearms instructor is being accompanied by irrational calls for more government intrusion into our lives.