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Jack KerwickSome readers of this column will no doubt remember the popular 80s' television series Dallas. Although the show ran for 14 seasons, due to what may have amounted to one of the biggest blunders in television history — the exiting of a pivotal character — one of these seasons was written off as a dream! To the dismay of many a viewer, the opening episode of the tenth season revealed that all of the events from the last segment of the eighth season through the entire ninth season never happened. Watching the collective response of leftists to the killing of Osama bin Laden, I am reminded of this chapter of Dallas, for it is difficult not to think that the happenings of the better part of the last decade are as well the contents of a dream.

What happens? You create moral confusion and chaos. The children are taught that morals are relative, and no one can say with authority what is right and what is wrong. And since there are no real consequences to bad behavior in the schools, obedience to authority goes out the window. Teachers become the object of the students' scorn and disrespect. Other students are either friends or enemies. You can even incite a student to commit suicide by unrelenting ridicule. You live by the law of the school jungle. And parents have no idea how to deal with the moral lawlessness in the schools.

“Somehow we have to figure out how to boost the price of gasoline to the levels in Europe,” said Steven Chu — the man Barack Obama would ultimately tap to be energy secretary — in September 2008. He was explaining to The Wall Street Journal that higher energy prices are the centerpiece of the Left’s energy overhaul. Well, I don’t know if they’ve figured out the Euro-boost yet, but we are halfway to Vienna.

Chip WoodMother’s Day seems like a perfect time to tell you about some of my mother’s extraordinary adventures. Bear with me for a bit and I’ll even tell you how to get a free copy of the book she wrote about one of them.

Jack KennyI recall encountering, in the misspent days of my youth, a comic book character who had come up with an ingenious way to break the habit of eating between meals: He would simply never stop eating, in which case there would be no "between meals." Unfortunately, some have given up drinking in similar fashion. The late Sen. Paul Douglas of Illinois long ago compared most alleged fiscal conservatives to reformers who cry out for temperance "in the intervals between cocktails." Little has changed since then, save perhaps the brevity and infrequency of the intervals.

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