Walter WilliamsLast December, I reported on Harvard University professor Stephan Thernstrom's essay "Minorities in College — Good News, But...," on Minding the Campus, a website sponsored by the New York-based Manhattan Institute. He was commenting on the results of the most recent National Assessment of Educational Progress, saying that the scores "mean that black students aged 17 do not read with any greater facility than whites who are four years younger and still in junior high.... Exactly the same glaring gaps appear in NAEP's tests of basic mathematics skills." Thernstrom asked, "If we put a randomly-selected group of 100 eighth-graders and another of 100 twelfth-graders in a typical college, would we expect the first group to perform as well as the second?" In other words, is it reasonable to expect a college freshman of any race who has the equivalent of an eighth-grade education to compete successfully with those having a 12th-grade education?

Thomas SowellLife has many good things. The problem is that most of these good things can be gotten only by sacrificing other good things. We all recognize this in our daily lives. It is only in politics that this simple, common sense fact is routinely ignored.

Money is anything that is commonly accepted as a medium of exchange, with government interjecting itself into the equation by designating certain notes as "legal tender." Historically, mediums of exchange have included gold and silver as well as other forms of what might be called commodity money. Yet,  you cannot pay your electric bill or your mortgage with a gold bar or even gold coins. You have to sell your gold for cash in order to use it to pay for things. Of course, at one time gold coins were used as money, but they aren’t today. And there was a time when paper money was backed by gold or silver. Paper money was then redeemable in gold and silver at a fixed price. Those of us who are seniors remember the time when dollars were silver certificates. Now they are backed by the “full faith and credit of the government.” But with government borrowing trillions of dollars in order to spend trillions of dollars, that “full faith and credit” is about to go down the drain.

Tom DeWeeseThe rush is on to force into law mandatory use of the E-Verify system that will mandate that all businesses use this hand-me-down from the Social Security Administration in order to hire anyone. Republican Representative Lamar Smith has introduced H.R. 2164, and House action is expected at any time. Say proponents, E-Verify is necessary to stop illegals from getting jobs. Many freedom-loving conservatives are supporting the idea in a desperate attempt to control illegal immigration. Is this the right way to protect America?

Chip WoodBefore I get into the main topic today, let me say by way of introduction: I hope every single U.S. Representative and Senator who votes to raise the U.S. debt limit has to find a new job after the next election.