I belong to a group tinier than I realized: I’m one of only 34 million Americans — roughly 11% of the population — tuning in National Public Radio (NPR) each week. That fraction probably shrinks to the low single digits if we limit it to daily listeners like me. And I may be a minority of one as a daily listener who cheered the U.S. House’s vote last week to “cut 100% of federal funding to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the primary source of federal funding for local public radio and television stations.”

Walter WilliamsEconomic lunacy abounds, and often the most learned, including Nobel Laureates, are its primary victims. The most recent example of economic lunacy is found in a Huffington Post article titled "The Silver Lining of Japan's Quake" written by Nathan Gardels, editor of New Perspectives Quarterly, who has also written articles for the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, and Washington Post.

Bob ConferWhen someone is sold a bad bill of goods he may suffer from “buyer’s remorse,” a feeling of regret maybe even disgust — accompanied by a healthy dose of second-guessing of the buyer’s own intelligence — over the purchase. That feeling can be applied to all aspects of life. For instance, there is no doubt that the five-person committee behind the Nobel Peace Prize has been experiencing “voter’s remorse” for their selection of Barack Obama as the 2009 recipient of the award.

In a very short time the people of Wisconsin will have to decide whether or not they want their state to be ruled by the goon squads of public employee unions or their elected representatives.

For years now environmentalists have been calling the shots when it comes to energy development in the United States. That’s why we don’t drill for oil where we know it exists in Alaska. That’s why an oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has brought oil drilling in the Gulf to a standstill. In fact, President Obama has announced that oil is the fuel of the past without telling us what exactly is the fuel of the future.