An optimist is someone who sees the glass half full, not half empty. An optimist is someone who sees the brighter side of life’s many ups and downs. An optimist knows that evil exists but believes that in the end good will triumph. For example, after America was attacked by Japan at Pearl Harbor and we entered World War II, I believed that we would win. Why? Because America always won its wars. That was the optimist in me.

Sex ed has been in Boston public schools for as long as we can remember. But apparently, a group of students are not satisfied with just being given condoms. They want to know more about sexually-transmitted diseases. According to the Boston Globe of February 16, the Boston Public Health Commission reports that 54 percent of city high school students have had sex, and half of them have had sex with more than three partners. Thus, the likelihood of these students getting a sexually transmitted disease is high.

In an age that glorifies specialization, and often threatens to narrow the interests and achievements of individuals to subfields sterilely reduced to less than an intellectual handbreadth, a person who is truly multifaceted and who offers contributions to a broad array of fields is to be received as a treasure. The recent “manifesto” produced by Jaron Lanier — one of the giants of “virtual reality” research — continues to demonstrate that its author is one such individual.

Look out, or the politicians hustling to rescue us from the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and its sexual assaults at the airport may run you over. 

Of course, these liars and hypocrites could simply abolish the TSA, either by introducing legislation to do so or, more easily, by refusing to re-authorize — and raise — its budget every year. That would guarantee that the agency never again molested a young woman, killed a missionary, or endangered an expectant mother and her baby. It could no longer violate the Constitution with its warrantless searches nor sic cops on us because of the “evidence” those fishing expeditions yield. The Feds would lose some of their power over us — and they can’t have that, can they?

Walter WilliamsWhy is it that Egyptians do well in the U.S. but not Egypt? We could make that same observation and pose that same question about Nigerians, Cambodians, Jamaicans and others of the underdeveloped world who migrate to the U.S. Until recently, we could make the same observation about Indians in India, and the Chinese citizens of the People's Republic of China, but not Chinese citizens of Hong Kong and Taiwan.

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