Op-ed/Reviews

February 2011 will mark the 82nd year since the publication of Dr. Samuel T. Orton’s critical article in the February 1929 issue of the Journal of Educational Psychology. Its title was “The ‘Sight-Reading’ Method of Teaching Reading as a Source of Reading Disability.”

I picked up this little book the other day in a discount bookstore.  Intrigued by the title, God Is a Salesman, I started thumbing through it and came across this thought-provoking passage:

In a move that screamed “too little too late,” the Department of Health and Human Services and the Environmental Protection Agency announced earlier this month that they were working together to lower the amount of fluoride both suggested and allowed in drinking water.

The U.S. Congress seems to love debt, or else our government would not have so much of it. Indeed, our present debt ceiling is $14.3 trillion, and there is a move in the administration to increase that ceiling in order to accommodate Obama’s deficit spending plans. The idea that the federal government can live far beyond its means is part of the liberal philosophy of tax and spend and/or borrow and spend. And unfortunately, Republicans have been as guilty of that sin as Democrats.

Jack KennyIt was a lie from the beginning. Norma McCorvey, the “Jane Roe” of Roe v. Wade, claimed her pregnancy was a result of rape. It wasn’t. McCorvey admitted the lie years later when she came out of the closet, so to speak, and joined the pro-life movement. But the lie served the purpose of the American Civil Liberties Union, which wanted a test case to strike down the Texas law that allowed abortion only when the life of the mother was at stake. By the time the U.S. Supreme Court had worked its alchemy on the Constitution, Roe v. Wade had become the vehicle for knocking down the abortion laws of nearly every state. On January 22, 1973, the Court declared abortion a right guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution. Some 50 million aborted babies later, the big lie marches on.

Log in