Thomas SowellThe big news, as far as the media are concerned, is the political game of debt-ceiling chicken that is being played by Democrats and Republicans in Washington. But, however much the media are focused on what is happening inside the Beltway, there is a whole country outside the Beltway — and the time is long overdue to start thinking about what is best for the rest of the country, not just for right now but for the long haul.

SEA ISLE, N.J. — I should be worrying about how the politicians are killing the nation financially, but that's on the back burner today because the 25th annual Red, White and Blueberry Festival is right up the road and they're estimating that 10,000 of us will show up and eat a million blueberries.

That works out to just 100 blueberries each -- a piece of cake. Or a nice stack of blueberry pancakes with blueberry syrup and a side of blueberry sausages.

Judging from President Obama’s lack of knowledge of basic free-market economics, I suggest that he invite Professor Walter E. Williams and author Thomas Sowell, two of America’s most eminent economists, to the White House to teach the President a course in basic economics — not the economics of Karl Marx, Nicolai Lenin, or Saul Alinsky, but the economics of Adam Smith, Frederic Bastiat, Jean-Baptiste Say, Milton Friedman, Ludwig Von Mises, and Friedrich Von Hayek, on which our free society and capitalist system are built. And since both Williams and Sowell are black Americans, he will see that free-market economics is not racially biased toward whites. Indeed, he will discover that two and two are four no matter what color you are.

Walter Williams is associated with that paradoxical phenomenon typically known as “black conservatism.” However, while Williams is a fierce opponent of the leftist political ideology that has overcome the majority of his fellow black Americans — he is a rightist — it is not altogether technically accurate to describe him as a conservative.

Captain AmericaMaking Captain America: The First Avenger was a huge film risk, but one that should pay off big for the Marvel superhero franchise. The Captain America reboot is mostly retro, something that has already failed in theaters, and starring a leading man who's never played the role. Based in the Second World War, where weakling Steve Rogers (played impeccably by Chris Evans) is rejected again and again by Army recruiters, Rogers signs up for an experimental program to create super-soldiers. Using science from expatriate German scientists, and the super-steroids (and "vita-rays," ... yeah, whatever that is), Rogers turns into Captain America.