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There is a Christian church in America that contends, as did many of our Christian forefathers, that America “is a choice land; and whatsoever nation shall possess it shall be free from bondage, and captivity, and from all other nations under heaven; if they but serve the God of this land, who is Jesus Christ.” (1) An interesting tenet.

In an age of American culture wars against the particularities of the various regions of these United States, many citizens act as if such regional differences which remain are almost an embarrassment. The notion that one’s identity is first centered on hearth and home; that religious faith first finds its expression at a local altar and pulpit; and that one may take pride in one’s community, state, and nation — in that order — has often fallen beneath the assault of atomizing individualism.

Thomas SowellOne of a surprising number of old, well-established politicians being challenged in this year's election by some unknown newcomer is Senator Russ Feingold in Wisconsin. In a recent debate between Senator Feingold and his new challenger, businessman Ron Johnson, the difference between the old pol and new guy on the block stood out.

"Forty-four percent of boys say they've seen sexual images of girls in their school, and about 15 percent of them are disseminating those images when they break up with the girls," explained Internet security specialist Parry Aftab on NBC's Today show.

SecretariatSecretariat, directed by Randall Wallace, opens with Secretariat's owner, Penny Chenery, quoting a Bible verse from Job. In the verse, God speaks of the horse in vivid language that evokes images of power and majesty. He describes His creation as a proud and haughty beast whose stride “swalloweth the ground with fierceness and rage” and whose neck is “clothed with thunder.” One could be forgiven for assuming that God was speaking of one horse in particular. With a stride that swallowed the ground at a gluttonous 25 feet and a neck that one Time reporter compared to a buffalo's, no horse epitomizes equinity quite like Secretariat.

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