"Terror Stalks U.S!"

 So screamed the printed edition of New York's Daily News last weekend — and it wasn't a forecast of Tuesday's election. Rather, it concerned the Yemeni "mail-bombs" and thus inexplicably lacked an exclamation mark; given the report's hysteria, I showed enormous restraint adding only one.

A lot of people talk about recycling; some people live it. Jerry Brown, who became governor of the nation's largest state in his late 30s, is going back to his old job, now that he's in his early 70s. And he is going back, he says, "full of energy, full of creativity and ready to serve" the people of the great state of California. How nice it must be to make such a gracious wonder of one's self. As Mack Davis used to sing, "Lord, it's hard to be humble."

Walter WilliamsOne tragedy of war is that its victors write its history and often do so with bias and dishonesty. That's true about our War of 1861, erroneously called a civil war. Civil wars, by the way, are when two or more parties attempt to take over the central government. Jefferson Davis no more wanted to take over Washington, D.C. than George Washington, in 1776, wanted to take over London. Both wars were wars of independence.

Despite the steadiness of the stream, the fertile field of “Founders Literature” never seems to reach a saturation point. Recently, a flood of books has flowed from familiar fountains: Joseph Ellis (First Family), Bruce Chadwick (Triumvirate), Pauline Maier (Ratification), and Ron Chernow (Washington: A Life). Thousands of pages on the lives and times of the men and women whose names are at the top of the dramatis personae of the founding drama.

Jack KennyOld war hawks never die, they just beat new war drums. Columnist David Broder, New Dealer emeritus at the Washington Post, believes he has discovered the elixir for our stubbornly stagnant economy, one that has the potential to make Barack Obama "one of the most successful presidents in history." And, oh yes, it will be good for the country, too. Heck, it worked for FDR, didn't it?

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