One of the things that made William F. Buckley, Jr. so much fun to read in the days before National Review became a house organ for Republican propaganda was that Buckley and others in his large and fun-loving orbit took such obvious, unrestrained delight in poking fun at liberal icons without the phony sentimentalism and sham decorum that prevented most writers from saying anything that would cause more respectable establishment commentators to say "Tsk tsk." When Eleanor Roosevelt died, for example, Buckley wrote in his syndicated column: "Following Mrs. Roosevelt in search of an irrationality was like following a lighted fuse in search of an explosion." One never had to wait very long.

Unstoppable posterSomeone must have forgotten to tell director Tony Scott that the old insult, “You couldn't direct a train wreck,” was never meant to be a challenge because he decided to try it. The result of that decision is Unstoppable, a movie inspired by a real-life runaway train in 2001 and Scott's second outing on the tracks, his first being The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3. Scott is in his element with Unstoppable. The film is textbook filmmaking with the ante being raised at every hair raising curve.

Morning Glory is not your average chick flick, though it embodies most of the necessary elements in order to be characterized as such. Of course, there is a beautiful and highly capable protagonist in need of a hero, and a handsome man with whom the lovely leading lady becomes enamored, but in a deviation from the standard chick flick, he is not a prince charming who swoops in and saves the day. In fact, our heroine owes much more of her “rescue” to a significantly older gentleman, and above all, to herself.

The headline atop the front page of my hometown newspaper announced on Friday, the day after Veterans Day, that federal funds for home-heating assistance have been cut in half. Not exactly heartwarming news in northern New England in mid-November. Meanwhile, half a world away, a story in the Kabul Press gives the calculation of how much it is costing NATO forces and their taxpayers back home to kill Taliban in Afghanistan. It comes to — brace yourselves, now — $50 million per dead Taliban.

It has been said that the most effective way to conquer a man is to capture his mind. There is no slave more devoted, no disciple more dedicated than one who has become completely obsessed with the vision of what he considers to be a great idea. (1)

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