The administration of Barack O'Bomber has not been a screaming success thus far, as just about any Republican will be happy to tell you. But a Democrat in the White House has one thing going for him that most Republicans don't like to admit. Whenever a big government program is in trouble, Republicans will ride to its rescue. That's bipartisanship. Being bipartisan means you never have to stand for principle.

In its fourth installment of the highly acclaimed Pirates of the Caribbean film series, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides deals with powerful themes of honor, sacrifice, and morality in a world characterized by sin, sexuality, and piracy. This latest installment is an unapologetically Christian film, but its ominous backdrop and debauchery may make it less likely to be viable family fare and perhaps a better fit for older audiences. 

Nowadays, in order to justify each and every sin under the sun, each and every assault upon the moral fiber of our family,community, and nation, one approach fits all: opponents of everything good and right, sensible and salutary need only push the claim that their privacy has been violated.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech before Congress on Tuesday, May 24, was a spectacle rarely seen in Washington. Both Democrats and Republicans gave the Israeli statesman over 25 standing ovations during the 40-minute address. The Washington Post described the occasion in these words:

Back on the Road to Serfdom“The road is always better than the inn,” said the great Cervantes, who was no doubt wrong about other things as well. The road is not always better than the inn. The traveler who was robbed and beaten on the road to Jericho probably didn’t think so. Even absent the brigands, there are a lot of variables, including the condition of the road, the weather conditions, and, most importantly, where the road leads. There is, according to an authority greater than Cervantes, a broad way that leadeth to destruction and many travel it. There is also a road to salvation and, because it is narrow, few find it and fewer still take it.