Cathy Gere’s new book, Knossos and the Prophets of Modernism, is of profound significance because it offers the reader an opportunity to examine the manner in which modern and post-modern ideological constructions have hijacked the archaeological study of ancient Crete in the service of various agendas.

Anyone who has frequented Tea Party gatherings has undoubtedly seen multiple signs sprinkled throughout the crowd calling on fellow citizens to “Throw the Bums Out!” Ditto for signs advocating terms limits. Oftentimes, exhortations for both are issued from the speakers’ platform.

The first political question I can recall ever asking was the one I put to my father when I was seven years old.

"Dad, who are we for?" I asked. "Are we for Eisenhower or Stevenson?" Dad laughed good-naturedly.

On your last visit to Washington, D.C., did you stand marvelling at the size and craftsmanship of the Lincoln Memorial? Did you pause and admire the sublime and simple neo-classical elegance of the Jefferson and Washington monuments? Then, did you wander over to the memorial dedicated to commemorating the unrivaled contributions of James Madison, the man known to history as the “Father of the Constitution?” No, you did not. Not because you don’t appreciate our fourth President’s lifelong dedication to limited government; rather, the Madison monument wasn’t on your list of things to see in the nation’s capital because no such monument exists.

Ralph R. ReilandEspecially after bad days, liberals like to go to columnists like Maureen Dowd at the New York Times for some reassurance that everything’s fine with liberalism and it’s just the rest of us who are a bad mix of weird, greedy, ethnocentric, dumb, and scary.