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Jack KennyThere is a saying about well-intentioned but misguided friends that takes on a special meaning this time of year: "God save me from my friends — I can protect myself from my enemies." And no, I don't mean friends or even family members who might better have given to charity the money they have spent on gifts for you they think are perfectly charming, but from which you derive no pleasure and for which you can find no use. No, I mean the well-intentioned friends of Christ who launch an unofficial campaign each year to "Keep Christ in Christmas."

(With apologies to St. Luke)

And it came to pass in those days that there went out a decree from the American Congress that all the country must buy medical insurance.

And this taxing was first made when Obama reigneth with the Democrats. Then the Republicans waxed envious that none of their own forty plans, however Marxist, profiteth them. Woe unto any party in the minority, for it hath no more power than it doth principle.

Ralph ReilandThe sky-is-falling greenies are getting progressively batty. It's not enough that we shut down our oil, gas, and coal industries, bike to work, switch our light bulbs, take cloth bags to the supermarket, smash our clunkers, take low-water showers, and turn our thermostats down, and sit in our mittens and tossel caps. Now they want us to cook our dogs.

“You are not in Kansas anymore,” the main antagonist Colonel Miles Quaritch (Stephen Lang) growls out at the beginning of the movie Avatar, “You are on Pandora.”

The movie is about a race of blue-colored humanoid native Na'vi inhabiting a moon named Pandora. Pandora revolves around a gas giant planet of the star Alpha Centauri A, one of the closest stars to our own sun.

The world of American politics has witnessed an interesting role reversal over the past couple of weeks. Barack Obama's most ardent liberal supporters are disappointed, in some cases bitterly, with the President's recent decisions and proclamations, while many of his "conservative" (more accurately, neo-conservative) critics seem encouraged by what they see as Obama's recently discovered "realism" in perceiving and defining America's purpose and mission in the world.

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