Unsurprisingly, in the wake of last week's deadly attacks in Paris, there has been an escalating demand — by those always in favor of such things — for an increase in surveillance. There has also been a call for limitations to technology that permits encrypted communications. The surveillance hawks seem to believe that liberty and security cannot coexist. Given the choice, they opt for sacrificing liberty for the sake of security.



When Net Neutrality was sold to the American people, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler promised there would be no regulation of content. No censorship. The rules would allow the FCC to regulate content, but they would "forbear" and leave things alone. Now where have we heard that before? It sounds too much like, "If you like your Internet, you can keep your Internet." Now, like with Obamacare, the truth is coming forward as lawmakers and experts warn of a coming political censorship of the Internet.

With a 3-2 vote on February 26, 2015, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) reclassified the Internet as a public utility under Title II of the Communications Act. Now, almost nine months later, the overreaching regulatory agency is still having to defend its action against one of its own. Commissioner Ajit Pai — who voted against the rules — has been unrelenting in his criticism and has the benefit of having the facts on his side. The FCC is also being forced to defend so-called "Net Neutrality" in a federal court.



In an effort to bring every last person into the “system,” so to speak, governments, globalist forces, and the United Nations want to make sure that every human being on the planet has a government-issued identification card, complete with biometric data. Indeed, the recently approved UN “Sustainable Development Goals,” also known as “Agenda 2030,” explicitly calls for providing “legal identity” and “birth registration” for “all.” A parallel effort led by the same forces pushing global IDs, meanwhile, hopes to abolish cash and move toward a “cashless” global society in which every transaction can be tracked. And with funding from U.S. taxpayers and various tax-exempt foundations controlled by the establishment, both of those visions could become a reality in the not-too-distant future.

When Microsoft released Windows 10 on July 29, the new operating system was already mired in controversy due to the way it monitors users' activities and reports back to Microsoft. Many news sites including The New American wrote about the spyware features of Windows 10. Some considered that reporting to be little more than fanciful conspiracy theories and exaggerations. With recent admissions from the Redmond, California software giant, however, it is now clear that those reports were accurate and that Windows 10 — as an operating system — is spyware.





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