Federal and state legislators have introduced legislation to force government agents to obtain a warrant before searching Americans' old e-mails, closing a convenient loophole in a 1986 law.

Last week Tom Wheeler, chairman of the FCC, published an op-ed piece for Wired which laid out his strategy to "ensure net neutrality" by treating the Internet as a public utility and applying the same types of regulations that are used for phone and electric companies. In this case, the antidote is worse than the poison.

During a 10-minute period one day in November 2008, British spies vacuumed up 70,000 e-mails to and from journalists at major media outlets in the United States and the U.K. And they did it with the blessings of Washington.

A hacker group calling itself Cyber Caliphate hacked the Twitter and YouTube accounts for the U.S. military Central Command on Monday and used the social media platforms to post pro-Islamic State messages and videos. President Obama promises to address cyber security.

The Federal Communications Commission announced on Friday it will be introducing and voting on new net neutrality rules in February. The proposals are sure to set off another storm of controversy as net neutrality has long been a contentious issue for those who believe in the free market and free speech.