Nothing says 21st century technology like … a blimp.

According to a story published by wired.com this fall, the Pentagon plans to deploy a “giant spy blimp” floating 20,000 feet above the ground that will house a supercomputer capable of monitoring the flow of all data and communication for miles around.

Under the guise of security, the Obama administration is creating an Internet ID for all Americans. The program for the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace was announced last week by Commerce Secretary Gary Locke.

If the President Obama’s plans for the Internet are implemented by the federal government, Internet anonymity may soon be a thing of the past. The whole project has been given the typically massaged moniker of “National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace” (NSTIC). The development of the strategy is not a sudden, recent development. (In fact, a June 2010 draft of the proposed strategy is available here from the Department of Homeland Security.) But comments last week by Commerce Secretary Gary Locke appear to indicate that the administration may be preparing to implement NSTIC.

Telecommunications and Internet companies are increasingly finding themselves in uncomfortable positions, caught between privacy laws that protect their consumers and law enforcement efforts that necessitate privacy invasion. As Internet and telecommunications services grow in popularity, law enforcement agencies have utilized them as a means to find information about individuals that would otherwise be difficult to obtain.

Big Brother may potentially be armed with yet another tool against the American populace, according to the New York Times: computers that can see and report on the behaviors of individuals. The computers may be used in prisons to analyze inmates' behavior and can alert corrections officers to potential incidents based on what the computer observes.