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The narrative continues over smartphone privacy issues involving the data logging program Carrier IQ, which was recently found to be installed on about 150 million handsets worldwide, including many popular Android, iOS, Nokia, and Blackberry devices. Controversy over the invasive software stemmed from allegations that Carrier IQ has the ability to record an array of device information, including keystrokes, text messages, web browsing, and user location, all without the user’s knowledge or expressed consent.

The anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks began releasing documents last week related to what it calls the “mass surveillance industry,” a little-known but expansive underworld of contractors offering tools for governments — from brutal dictatorships to more moderate Western states — to monitor citizens and hunt down dissidents. Furious activists reacted to the revelations by calling for stricter controls and measures to hold the firms accountable as “accomplices” to mass murder.  

smartphoneHere’s a headline the world’s 400 million-plus users of smartphones don’t want to read: 

“Your smartphone is probably spying on you.”

A group of anti-world government hacker activists or “hacktivists” under the banner of “TeamPoison” hacked the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), releasing hundreds of passwords belonging to the organization’s bureaucrats. The release also included a message blasting the global body and its affiliates for corruption, fraud, and atrocities, along with a warning of more attacks to come.

FacebookFacebook is in trouble once again over possible privacy breaches. According to government officials, Facebook has misled over 800 million users regarding the safety of their personal information.

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