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computer twiligtIt’s no secret that the federal government — the FCC, in particular — has been seeking for years for ways to take control of the Internet. For a decade and a half now, the Web has been a blessed enclave of liberty where the grasping hand of the state, with its stifling regulations and debilitating taxes, has been unable to penetrate. Now, according to the Washington Times, the feds are at it again, and this time, they’re serious:

Are online TV alternatives prompting a mass exodus of viewers from cable and satellite television services? That depends on who you’re talking to. With the influx of such Internet-based video offerings as Hulu, Netflix, Google TV, Apple TV, and other Internet Protocol TV (IPTV) services, which allow individuals to watch programs on TVs as well as laptops, iPods, smart phones, and other mobile devices, some industry observers predict that more and more viewers will soon be opting out of traditional TV.

Apple’s Application Store recently removed a religious iPhone application called the “Manhattan Declaration,” prompting protests from a Christian group.

In spite of rising security fears, 33 of our states are allowing some fax, e-mail, or Internet ballots this year. Adding to concerns is news of a security breach in a Washington, D.C., pilot Internet vote. The system was put online for a test in September.

Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), with the help of UC Berkeley’s Samuelson Clinic, filed a lawsuit under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) against the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to determine the scope of social network surveillance conducted by the agency during the Obama inauguration.

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