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House Republicans passed two amendments on a spending bill Tuesday that would bar the federal government from imposing light bulb standards that critics say are too meddlesome. Passed through a voice vote, the provision would amend the Energy and Water spending bill for 2013 by preventing the Energy Department from spending money to enforce bulb efficiency regulations that were established in a law passed during the Bush administration.

Under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, the phase-out was slated to commence in January 2012, which banned the sale of all 100-watt bulbs, as well as the sale of all 75-watt bulbs by July 2013. But a spending bill passed last December stalled the mandate until this October.

Many claims have been made that curbside recycling reduces energy usage, conserves resources, and reduces pollution, but that is not true.

In light of a new study of public opinion that correlates scientific knowledge and concerns regarding global warming, it appears that environmental fear-mongering is tapping into fear of the unknown. In other words, the more scientifically knowledgeable a person is, the less likely he is to be troubled by the alarmist rhetoric of the purveyors of ecological gloom and doom.

With the heat of summer looming in the immediate future, radical environmentalists have conjured a new global warming threat with which to alarm the public. According to a new report from the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC), tens of thousands of Americans will begin to die from the effects of global warming. The report, "Killer Summer Heat," begins with the measured, calm tones of scientific discourse: “Climate change is literally killing us.” However, despite the panic tones, mankind has proven to be an amazingly adaptive species, and even climate scientists have had to admit there is little evidence of warming — let alone a human cause to any such warming.

Research reveals a newly discovered basin under the West Antarctic Ice Sheet scientists say could make the area more vulnerable to collapse and sea levels more likely to rise. Are we at risk of drowning?

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