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Environment

In May-June 1992, this correspondent was jammed cheek to jowl with 30,000 greenies in a global mosh pit known as the United Nations Earth Summit. From that initial event in Rio de Janeiro — and its successors — has flowed a deluge of treaties, conventions, and proposed regimes to regulate (i.e., to control) all human life and activity on our planet.

Ignoring the overwhelming, and steadily growing, body of scientific evidence that the global-warming "crisis" is nonexistent, President Clinton issued an environmental "clarion call" (his term) to the nation in his Earth Day '93 address. "I reaffirm, my personal, and announce our nation's commitment," he said, "to reducing our emissions of greenhouse gases to their 1990 levels by the year 2000."

A controversial billboard campaign by the Heartland Institute comes under fire from critics who say it likens climate-change scientists to terrorists.

New research proves Greenland's glaciers are flowing more slowly than predicted, but experts still fear threats to coastal communities from sea level rise. Are their fears unfounded?

The EPA is preparing to incorporate Agenda 21 sustainability across all its activities, making its already-stifling regulations even worse.

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