Environmentalists and their governmental counterparts throughout the United States and Canada are expressing their outrage and threatening legal action against a project undertaken in international waters that was intended to lower the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and increase the population of salmon. At the heart of the controversy are the actions of the Haida Salmon Restoration Corporation (HSRC), which spread 100 tons of iron dust in the ocean with the intention of boosting the level of plankton in the surrounding sea water — and thus increasing the food available for the surrounding salmon population.

Arctic wildlife biologist Charles Monnett, the scientist who galvanized the environmentalist polar bear conservation movement in 2006, is back in his old job with the Department of the Interior (DOI) after a two-year investigation into charges of data falsification in research stating that alarming numbers of polar bears are drowning due to melting sea ice caused by global warming.

Through a series of training and awareness programs, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is embarking on a $1.2-million expedition to offer “asthma-friendly homes” training and outreach programs to curb exposure to indoor contaminants. Focusing primarily on homes and schools, the EPA announced earlier this year 32 assistant agreements to state and local governments and non-profit groups for the air pollution-abatement project.

Despite playing a key role in advancing climate change hysteria, the United Kingdom’s National Weather Service, known as the Met Office, quietly released a report last week conceding that so-called “global warming” actually stopped more than 15 years ago. The startling admission shows once again that United Nations theories and climate models are wildly inaccurate at best, experts say, meaning multi-trillion dollar schemes to deal with alleged human-caused “climate change” are at the very least severely misguided. 

Climate change is destroying traditional cultures and economies in Greenland, according to a recently published article in the New York Times. Correspondent Elizabeth Rosenthal highlights Narsaq, a town on the southern coast where the mainstay fishing industry is dwindling due to stock depletion in ever-warming waters. Yet melting ice is uncovering "vast new deposits of minerals and gems ... forming the basis of a potentially lucrative mining industry" that could one day mean independence for Greenland from its parent state of Denmark.

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