Seattle reaped the benefit of a $20 million federal grant to weatherize homes in one of America’s "greenest" cities, and 16 months later, a whopping 14 jobs were created — making the cost per job a wondrous $1,428,571. "The jobs are not there," Todd Myers, author of the book Eco Fads, told Fox News. "So we’re training people for jobs that don’t exist." (In his famous October 27, 1964 speech in behalf of presidential candidate Barry Goldwater, Ronald Reagan noted that Lyndon Johnson's "War on Poverty" proposed job training camps "that we're going to spend each year just on room and board for each young person we help 4,700 dollars a year. We can send them to Harvard for 2,700!")

At approximately 8:45 a.m. on August 24, federal agents raided Gibson Guitar Corporation facilities in Nashville and Memphis, making off with an estimated $1 million worth of Gibson property. Gibson’s alleged crime? Using imported wood from endangered trees.

Hurricane IreneAmericans on the East Coast of the United States were preparing for the worst as Hurricane Irene finally made landfall in North Carolina. The projected path and strength of the hurricane have already prompted a number of states to declare states of emergency and declare mandatory evacuations, even before a drop of rain has fallen in some of those regions.

On Tuesday, a remarkable and unexpected event took place in some areas on the East Coast: a 5.8-magnitude earthquake centered northwest of Richmond, Virginia, which caused a stir in cities that do not often encounter such phenomena, including New York and Washington.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is sketching out a regulatory blueprint designed to control pollution levels from coal-fired power plants, and lying under the torrent of new regulations will be mercury, smog, water intake, coal ash, and greenhouse gases.