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According to British Petroleum, safety is always top priority. That's what BP Spokesman Robert Wine told CNN for a report on the Deepwater Horizon explosion for June 9. The statement echoed company policy officially described in the BP Code of Conduct, which states:  "BP's commitment to safety means each of us needs to be alert to safety risks as we go about our jobs.... Always ... Stop any work that becomes unsafe."

Oil has stopped flowing into the Gulf in the wake of BP's installation of a new cap on its broken well in the Gulf of Mexico.

oIl Leak in GulfThe Gulf of Mexico oil leak began on April 20 when an explosion on the oil rig Deepwater Horizon tragically claimed the lives of 11 BP America employees. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) determined that within a month, the volume of the leak surpassed 1989’s Exxon Valdez disaster of 11 million gallons spilled off the coast of Alaska. USGS estimated the leak rate to be as much as five times BP’s claim of 5,000 barrels per day.

In an effort to tackle emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), Belgium is considering a radical and controversial proposal to dissolve human bodies and dispose of them in sewage systems, according to international news reports. Undertakers hope to have approval in a few months.

Muir RussellThose of us who have watched the British comedy series Yes, Minister, and its sequel Yes, Prime Minister, understand the insidious relationship between the British Civil Service and the ministerial officials who theoretically govern the nation on behalf of the people. The “official investigation,” conducted by civil servants when uncomfortable facts come to light, is a device intended solely to find no proof of official wrongdoing.

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