The Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology believes it has discovered in the annals of history a champion — though inadvertent — of environmentalism. They proclaim:

Genghis Khan’s Mongol invasion in the 13th and 14th centuries was so vast that it may have been the first instance in history of a single culture causing man-made climate change, according to new research out of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology. Unlike modern day climate change, however, the Mongol invasion actually cooled the planet, effectively scrubbing around 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere.

Despite the environmental and financial failure of federally subsidized ethanol, the Environmental Protection Agency has approved even greater use of the fuel additive. On Friday, the EPA approved the use of 15 percent-blend ethanol for cars and trucks produced in the year 2001 and later. The decision expands upon an October EPA decision which increased ethanol blends with unleaded gasoline from 10 to 15 percent.

An agency of the federal government is having a hard time placing a dollar value on the life of American citizens. Although the debate at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has probably escaped the attention of most of this nation’s citizens, it has a direct impact on the economic cost of the agency’s regulations — and thus a direct or indirect financial impact on the lives of those Americans the agency claims to be protecting.

As the tortured science which is invoked to support the theory of anthropogenic climate change continues to lose its credibility in the eyes of the American public, it appears that some of the theory’s advocates are weighing the virtues of using blunt force to impose the changes they believe are necessary to "save the world." Consider, for example, Dr. James Hansen (left) of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, who seems to believe that Western freedoms may be part of the problem, and that Chinese tyranny may be able to lead the way to a greener future.

The Environmental Protection Agency continues to pursue job-killing measures, reports the Competitive Enterprise Institute. The latest EPA endeavor involves revoking the Clean Water Act permit from the coal mine in Logan County, West Virginia — a measure expected to decrease investment in energy projects and destroy jobs.